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Erianne A. Weight, Barbara Osborne and Robert Turner

Aaron Kelly, a highly respected college sport consultant, is charged with the task of presenting a new model of intercollegiate athletic administration to a panel of leaders in the field. Coincidence and research led him to a successful National Junior College Athletic Association athletic program that was discontinued in pursuit of a new model of competitive intra-collegiate athletics when the institution transitioned to a four-year university. Given the purpose of athletics within the academe to facilitate an educational experience difficult to replicate through any other opportunity, (Brand, 2006; NCAA 2010; Rader, 1999) this program sheds light on a new way to view this tradition we have come to know as college sport. The purpose of this case is to highlight the tremendous potential for innovation that exists within the intercollegiate athletic model. While financial challenges make it difficult for many institutions to sponsor broad-based intercollegiate athletics programs, this model presents a design that can reduce expenditures and provide additional participation opportunities for education through athletics. As Kelly prepares for his presentation, he questions whether this model is ideal and how the landscape of intercollegiate athletics might be affected if implemented on a national scale.

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Erianne A. Weight, Coyte Cooper and Nels K. Popp

Philosophical debate about the proper role of athletics within the academy has reverberated through each era of collegiate sport, and a growing body of literature points toward an impending tipping point unless radical reform ensues. This study contributes perspective to a proposed reform model through investigating perceptions of National Collegiate Athletics Association Division I coaches (N = 661) about their roles as educators and how this role could be altered through structural and philosophical changes within the academy. Quantitative and qualitative data provided mixed findings related to coach support for an integrated organizational structure with high variance in all structural facets explored except for compensation, where coaches believed structures should not be uniform between athletic and academic units because of the perceived greater workload, hours, media attention, and pressure in athletics.

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Nels Popp, Erianne A. Weight, Brendan Dwyer, Alan L. Morse and Amy Baker

This study examined satisfaction levels with graduate sport management programs in the United States. A 26-item graduate degree program satisfaction instrument was developed and administered electronically to a sample of current students and alumni from seven sport management master’s degree programs yielding a 54.31% response rate (N = 302). Respondents generally indicated high levels of satisfaction with their decision to pursue a graduate sport management degree, but were significantly less satisfied with the specific school they attended. Respondents indicated the most beneficial courses included current topics, sport and society, sport marketing, and sport ethics, whereas the least beneficial courses included statistics, international sport, and research methods. Students who earned their undergraduate degree in business were consistently less satisfied with how well their graduate program taught them various sport management skills compared with students with undergraduate degrees in sport management, sport-related studies, or other majors.