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Andrea N. Eagleman and Erin L. McNary

As undergraduate sport management programs continue to grow and expand in the United States, and with the recently developed Commission on Sport Management Accreditation (COSMA) accreditation guidelines for such programs, it is important to examine the current status of undergraduate sport management curricula in the U.S. The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of each program’s curriculum and other program components such as the school/college in which each program is housed, program name, and degree(s) offered. A total of 227 undergraduate sport management programs were identified and examined using a content analysis methodology. Results revealed the percentage of programs offering specific sport management courses, as well as significant differences between programs based on the school in which the program is housed, the status of the university (public or private), and the university size. These findings, along with recommendations for future research, are presented in the discussion and conclusion sections.

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Andrea N. Geurin-Eagleman and Erin McNary

Past research shows that the job market for sport management academic positions was strong, with more job openings than qualified professors to fill the positions. Due to changing global and higher education climates, however, it was necessary to conduct further research to examine how these shifts in the external environment have impacted the sport management job market. Therefore, this study employed a content analysis methodology to examine the faculty job openings in sport management from 2010 to 2011. In addition, current doctoral students were surveyed to determine their preparation and expectations for the academic job market. Results revealed much greater parity between the number of open positions and the number of doctoral student job seekers than ever before. Similarities and differences were discovered between the actual job market and students’ career expectations and goals. Ultimately, the job market has become more competitive and job seekers must take steps to ensure a competitive advantage.