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Kerry McGawley, Erwan Leclair, Jeanne Dekerle, Helen Carter and Craig A. Williams

The Wingate cycle test (WAnT) is a 30-s test commonly used to estimate anaerobic work capacity (AWC). However, the test may be too short to fully deplete anaerobic energy reserves. We hypothesized that a 90-s all-out isokinetic test (ISO_90) would be valid to assess both aerobic and anaerobic capacities in young females. Eight girls (11.9 ± 0.5 y) performed an exhaustive incremental test, a WAnT and an ISO_90. Peak VO2 attained during the ISO_90 was significantly greater than VO2peak. Mean power, end power, fatigue index, total work done and AWC were not significantly different between the WAnT and after 30 s of the 90-s test (i.e., ISO_30). However, 95% limits of agreement showed large variations between the two tests when comparing all anaerobic parameters. It is concluded that an ISO-90 may be a useful test to assess aerobic capacity in young girls. However, since the anaerobic parameters derived from the ISO_30 did not agree with those derived from a traditional WAnT, the validity of using an ISO_90 to assess anaerobic performance and capacity within this population group remains unconfirmed.

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Erwan Leclair, Delphine Thevenet, Sophie C. Reguem, Benoit Borel, Georges Baquet, Serge Berthoin and Patrick Mucci

This study was designed to test the reproducibility of muscle oxygenation by NIRS in children during exercise. Twelve healthy non-obese and non-trained children performed one maximal graded test, and four 6-min constant load cycle exercises. Deoxy-hemoglobin (Hb/Mb-H+) data were averaged every 1, 5, 10, 20 and 30s. Hb/Mb-H+ data averaged every 5, 10, 20 and 30s showed good reproducibility. When averaged every second, Hb/Mb-H+ values were reproducible after the first minute of exercise. Based on 1s averaged signal modeling, time period and t values for Hb/Mb-H+ were not reproducible but mean response time values showed an acceptable reproducibility.

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Erwan Leclair, Benoit Borel, Delphine Thevenet, Georges Baquet, Patrick Mucci and Serge Berthoin

This study first aimed to compare critical power (CP) and anaerobic work capacity (AWC), to laboratory standard evaluation methods such as maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max) and maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD). Secondly, this study compared child and adult CP and AWC values. Subjects performed a maximal graded test to determine V̇O2max and maximal aerobic power (MAP); and four constant load exercises. In children, CP (W.kg−1) was related to V̇O2max (ml.kg−1.min−1; r = .68; p = .004). AWC (J.kg−1) in children was related to MAOD (r = .58; p = .018). Children presented lower AWC (J.kg−1; p = .001) than adults, but similar CP (%MAP) values. CP (%MAP and W.kg−1) and AWC (J.kg−1) were significantly related to laboratory standard evaluation methods but low correlation indicated that they cannot be used interchangeably. CP (%MAP) was similar in children and adults, but AWC (J.kg−1) was significantly lower in children. These conclusions support existing knowledge related to child-adults characteristics.