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  • Author: Filiz Colakoglu x
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Hande Guney, Gulcan Harput, Filiz Colakoglu and Gul Baltaci

Context:

Glenohumeral (GH) internal-rotation deficit (GIRD) and lower eccentric external-rotator (ER) to concentric internal-rotator (IR) strength (ER:IR) ratio have been documented as risk factors for shoulder injuries, but there is no information on whether GIRD has an adverse effect on ER:IR ratio in adolescent overhead athletes.

Objectives:

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GIRD on functional ER:IR ratio of the adolescent overhead athletes.

Design:

Cross-sectional study.

Setting:

University research laboratory.

Participants:

52 adolescent overhead athletes.

Main Outcome Measures:

To determine GIRD, the range of GH IR and ER motion was measured with a digital inclinometer. An isokinetic dynamometer was used to assess eccentric and concentric IR and ER muscle strength of the dominant and nondominant shoulders. One-way ANCOVA where sport type was set as a covariate was used to analyze the difference between athletes with and without GIRD.

Results:

After standardized examinations of all shoulders, the athletes were divided into 2 groups, shoulders with (n = 27) and without GIRD (n = 25). There was a significant difference between groups in functional ER:IR ratio (P < .001). Athletes with GIRD had lower ER:IR ratio (0.56) than athletes without GIRD (0.83).

Conclusions:

As GIRD has an adverse effect on functional ratio of the shoulder-rotator muscles, interventions for adolescent overhead athletes should include improving GH-rotation range of motion.

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Derya Ozer Kaya, Irem Duzgun, Gul Baltaci, Selma Karacan and Filiz Colakoglu

Objective:

To assess and compare the effects of 6 mo of Pilates and calisthenics on multijoint coordination and proprioception of the lower limbs at the 3rd and 6th mo of training.

Design:

Randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded, repeated-measures.

Setting:

University research laboratory.

Participants and Intervention:

Healthy, sedentary, female participants age 25–50 y were recruited and randomly divided into 3 groups: a calisthenic exercise group (n = 34, mean age ± SD 40 ± 8 y, body-mass index [BMI] 31.04 ± 4.83 kg/m2), a Pilates exercise group (n = 32, mean age ± SD 37 ± 8 y, BMI 31.04 ± 4.83 kg/m2), and a control group (n = 41, mean age ± SD 41 ± 7 y, BMI 27.09 ± 4.77 kg/m2). The calisthenics and Pilates groups underwent related training programs for 6 mo, while the controls had no specific training.

Main Outcome Measures:

Coordination and proprioception of the lower extremities with concentric and eccentric performances in the closed kinetic chain assessed with the monitored rehab functional squat system at baseline and at the 3rd and 6th mo of training.

Results:

For the within-group comparison, coordinative concentric and eccentric deviation values were significantly decreased for both dominant and nondominant lower limbs at pretraining and at the 3rd and 6th mo posttraining in the calisthenics group (P < .05). In contrast, there was no improvement in the Pilates group throughout the training. However, for comparisons between groups, the baseline values of coordinative concentric and eccentric deviations were different in the calisthenics group than in Pilates and the controls (P < .05). There were no differences in the proprioception values of either visible or nonvisible movement in any group throughout the training (P > .05).

Conclusions:

It seems that calisthenic exercises are more likely to improve coordination of the lower extremity after 3 and 6 mo of training than Pilates exercises. Calisthenic exercises may be useful for individuals who require improved coordination.

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Irem Duzgun, Gul Baltaci, Filiz Colakoglu, Volga Bayrakci Tunay and Derya Ozer

Objective:

To investigate the effect of a 12-wk weighted-jump-rope training program on shoulder strength.

Design:

Pretest to posttest experimental design.

Setting:

University sports physiotherapy laboratory.

Participants:

24 healthy volleyball players age 13-16 y.

Intervention:

Group 1 took weighted-rope training (n = 9), group 2 took unweighted-rope training (n = 8), and group 3 did not train with any specific program (n = 7).

Main Outcome Measures:

Players’ strength determined with an isokinetic dynamometer (Isomed 2000) at 180 and 60°/s on external and internal rotators, supraspinatus peak torque, and total work of the dominant shoulder. Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U tests were used to determine the difference among the groups.

Results:

At pretraining evaluation, there were no significant differences in the test scores of the isokinetic test of full can and empty can between the groups at 60 and 180°/s. There was no statistically significant difference for 60 and 180°/s between pretraining and posttraining assessment (P > .05) except that total eccentric work increased in groups 1 and 3 but decreased in group 2 at 180°/s during the full can (P < .05). There was no significant difference among the groups between the pretraining and posttraining testing at both 180 and 60°/s for the empty can (P > .05). Internal-rotation values at 60 and 180°/s decreased for both peak torque and total work for all groups. External-rotation peak torque and total work at 60°/s increased for group 1. External-rotation peak torque and total work at 180°/s increased for all groups.

Conclusions:

The results indicate that a jump-rope training program is a good conditioning method for overhead athletes because of its potential benefits to shoulder strength.