Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author: Fiona Chambers x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Fiona Chambers and Robin Gregg

This paper highlights the status of coaching and coach education policy and practice on the island of Ireland. The island of Ireland represents a unique setting as it comprises a hybrid jurisdiction of (a) the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland and (b) the Republic of Ireland. A historical and sociopolitical backdrop provides insight into how key agencies develop coaching and coach education policy and practice in a highly complex dual environment. A five-step meta-synthesis process of data collection and analysis revealed key policy and practice issues on the island relating to (a) the coaching workforce and (b) coach education system.

Restricted access

Sarahjane Belton, Gavin Breslin, Stephen Shannon, Wesley O’Brien, Ben Fitzpatrick, Tandy Haughey, Fiona Chambers, Danielle Powell, Darryl McCullagh and Deirdre Brennan

Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate daily physical activity (PA) patterns of 8- to 9-year-old Irish children from socially disadvantaged areas. Methods: Children (N = 408) were asked to wear an ActiGraph accelerometer for a minimum of 4 days. Based on mean daily moderate- to vigorous-intensity PA accumulation, participants were grouped into sex-specific quartiles (Q4, most active; Q1, least active). Principal component analysis was used to identify distinct time blocks for weekdays and weekend days. Results: Overall, 213 participants (8.7 [0.5] y) met accelerometer inclusion criteria. Of these, 56.7% met the 60 minutes of moderate- to vigorous-intensity PA per day guidelines, with males statistically significantly more likely to do so than females (P < .01). Principal component analysis revealed 3 distinct time periods on weekdays and 4 distinct periods on weekends that children were active. The total difference in moderate- to vigorous-intensity PA accumulation between Q4 (most active) and Q1 (least active) was greatest in the after-school time period (male: 49 min and female: 33 min) on weekdays and in the evening time period on weekends (male: 33 min and female: 19 min). Conclusions: After-school and weekend evenings are critical “activity rich” time periods in terms of the gap between our most and least active disadvantaged children.