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Lawrence E. Armstrong, Jorge A. Herrera Soto, Frank T. Hacker Jr., Douglas J. Casa, Stavros A. Kavouras, and Carl M. Maresh

This investigation evaluated the validity and sensitivity of urine color (Ucol), specific gravity (Usg), and osmolality (Uosm) as indices of hydration status, by comparing them to changes in body water. Nine highly trained males underwent a 42-hr protocol involving dehydration to 3.7% of body mass (Day 1, −2.64 kg), cycling to exhaustion (Day 2, −5.2% of body mass, −3.68 kg), and oral rehydration for 21 hr. The ranges of mean (across time) blood and urine values were Ucol, 1-7; Usg, 1.004-1.029; U08m, 117-1,081 mOsm • kg−1; and plasma osmolality (Posm), 280-298 mOsm ⋅ kg−1. Urine color tracked changes in body water as effectively as (or better than) Uosm, Usg, urine volume, Posm, plasma sodium, and plasma total protein. We concluded that (a) Ucol, Uosm, and Usg are valid indices of hydration status, and (b) marked dehydration, exercise, and rehydration had little effect on the validity and sensitivity of these indices.

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Douglas J. Casa, Carl M. Maresh, Lawrence E. Armstrong, Stavros A. Kavouras, Jorge A. Herrera-Soto, Frank T. Hacker Jr., Timothy P. Scheett, and James Stoppani

The purpose of this study was to determine if intravenous fluid rehydration, versus oral rehydration. during a brief period (20 min) differentially affects plasma ACTH, cortisol, and norepinephrine concentrations during subsequent exhaustive exercise in the heat. Following dehydration (DHY) to −4% of body weight, 8 nonacclimated highly trained males (age = 23.5 ± 1.2 years, V̇O2peak = 61.4±0.8 ml · kg · min−1, % body fat = 13.5±0.6%) cycled to exhaustion at 74% V̇O2peak in 36.8 °C on three different occasions. These included: (a) no fluid (NF), where no fluid was provided during the rehydration period; (b) DRINK, where oral rehydration (0.45% NaCl) was provided equal to 50% of the prior DHY; and (c) IV, where intravenous infusion (0.45% NaCl) was provided equal to 50%’ of the prior DHY. Exercise time to exhaustion was not different p = .07) between the DRINK (34.86 ±4.01) and IV (29.48 ± 3.50) trials, but both were significantly p < .05) longer than the NF (18.95 ± 2.73) trial. No differences (p > .05) were found for any of the hormone measures among trials. The endocrine responses at exhaustion were similar regardless of hydration state and mode of rehydration, but rehydration prolonged the exercise time to exhaustion.