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Jennifer Rogers, Robert W. Summers and G. Patrick Lambert

The purpose of this study was to determine if lowering carbohydrate (CHO) concentration in a sport drink influences gastric emptying, intestinal absorption, or performance during cycle ergometry (85 min, 60% VO2peak). Five subjects (25 ± 1 y, 61.5 ± 2.1 mL · kg−1 · min−1 VO2peak) ingested a 3% CHO, 6% CHO, or a water placebo (WP) beverage during exercise. Gastric emptying was determined by repeated double sampling and intestinal absorption by segmental perfusion. Total solute absorption and plasma glucose was greater for 6% CHO; however, neither gastric emptying, intestinal water absorption, or 3-mi time trial performance (7:58 ± 0:33 min, 8:13 ± 0:25 min, and 8:25 ± 0:29 min, respectively, for 6% CHO, 3% CHO, and WP) differed among solutions. These results indicate lowering the CHO concentration of a sport drink from 6% CHO does not enhance gastric emptying, intestinal water absorption, or time trial performance, but reduces CHO and total solute absorption.

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James A. Lang, Carl V. Gisolfi and G. Patrick Lambert

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of exercise intensity on active and passive intestinal glucose absorption. Eight trained runners (age = 23 ± 2 y; VO2max = 62.1 ± 5.8 mL · kg−1 · min−1) performed a 1 h resting experiment and three 1 h treadmill experiments at 30, 50, or 70% VO2max in a thermoneutral environment. Immediately prior to each experiment, euhydrated subjects ingested a solution containing two non-metabolizable glucose analogs, 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (3MG; actively absorbed; 5 g) and D-xylose (passively absorbed; 5 g). During the following 5 h, all urine was collected and the amount of 3MG and D-xylose in the urine was determined. Using repeated measures ANOVA, a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in urinary excretion of each carbohydrate was observed at 70% VO2max compared to the other intensities suggesting that both active and passive intestinal absorption of glucose may be reduced during prolonged running at this intensity.

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G. Patrick Lambert, Timothy L. Bleiler, Ray-Tai Chang, Alan K. Johnson and Carl V. Gisolfi

Eight male runners performed four 2-hr treadmill runs at 65% ~ 0 , m a x in the heat (35"C, 15-20% RH). A different beverage was offered each trial and subjects drank ad libitum for 2 min every 20 min. The beverages were, 6% carbohydrate (CHO) solution (NC 6), 6% carbonated-CHO solution (C 6), 10% CHO solution (NC 10), and 10% carbonated-CHO solution (C 10). NC 6 and C 6 contained 4% sucrose and 2% glucose. NC 10 and C 10 contained high fructose corn syrup. Subjects drank more NC 6 than C 6. Fluid consumption was not different among other trials. During all trials, volume consumed and %ΔPV declined while heart rate and rectal temperature increased (p<0.05). No significant differences occurred between beverages for these variables. Percent body weight lost was greater (p<0.05) for the C 10 trial compared to the NC 6 trial. Neither sweat rate, percent fluid replaced, plasma [Na+], [K+], osmolality, percent of drink volume emptied from the stomach, or glucose concentration differed among trials. Plasma [K+] and osmolality increased (p<0.05) over time. Ratings of fullness and thirst were not different among beverages, although both perceptions increased (p<0.05) with time. It is concluded that (a) carbonation decreased the consumption of the 6% CHO beverage; (b) fluid homeostasis and thermoregulation were unaffected by the solutions ingested; and (c) fluid consumption decreased with time, while ratings of fullness and thirst increased.