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  • Author: Gail M. Dummer x
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Gail M. Dummer

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Gail M. Dummer

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Bemd Doll and Gail M. Dummer

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Patrick J. DiRocco and Gail M. Dummer

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Fiona J. Connor-Kuntz and Gail M. Dummer

Children age 4 to 6 years from special education (n = 26), Head Start (n = 35), and typical preschool classes (n = 11) were assigned to a physical activity intervention or a language-enriched physical activity intervention. Language and motor skill performances were measured before, immediately following, and 3 months following the 24-session, 8-week intervention. Results illustrated that language instruction can be added to physical education lessons without requiring additional instructional time and, more importantly, without compromising improvement in motor skill performance. Further, preschool children exposed to language-enriched physical education improved their language skills regardless of whether their educational progress was characterized by a cognitive and/or language delay. Thus, physical activity appears to be an effective environment in which to enhance the cognitive development of preschool children of all abilities.

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Deborah R. Shapiro and Gail M. Dummer

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between perceived and actual basketball competence for 25 adolescent males, ages 12 to 15, with mild mental retardation. Participants completed a Pictorial Scale of Perceived Basketball Competence and a modified version of the AAHPER Basketball Skills Test for Boys. Consistent with Harter’s (1978) theory of perceived competence, a positive relationship was found between perceived and actual basketball competence for the individual skills of push pass for accuracy (r s = .38, p = .03), jump and reach (r s = .42, p = .02), speed dribble (r s = .21, p = .16), and free-throw shooting (r s = .37, p = .03), and for the combined battery of four skills (r s = .46, p = .01). Issues relating to cognitive development of participants, testing methodology, statistical analysis techniques, and task characteristics serve as possible explanations for the results of this investigation.

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Debra S. Berkey and Gail M. Dummer

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G. William Gayle and Gail M. Dummer

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Karen P. DePauw and Gail M. Dummer