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Letter to the Editor: Can Older Adults “Walk” Their Way to Successful Aging? The Case for Physical Activity Literacy for an Aging Population

Gareth Jones and Liza Stathokostas

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Exercise Modality Choices One Year After Intervention in Previously Inactive Older Men and Women

Liza Stathokostas and Gareth R. Jones

A convenience sample of 176 healthy, community-dwelling, inactive older adults (mean age 70 ± 5 years; 62 males, 114 females) were tracked for one year. The purpose was to describe the exercise modality choices older adults make one year following participation in an exercise and education intervention. Telephone follow-up contacted 137 participants (78%, men = 50, women = 87) and 62% of the men and 69% of the women reported to be “currently exercising.” Exercising independently was the most common type of exercise reported by 81% and 64% of men and women, respectively. Walking was the most commonly reported modality by both genders. The setting of exercise was most often reported to be at home or outside for both men and women. The main reason for continued participation at 12 months was for overall health (50% of men and 40% of women). Little variation was observed for exercise modality choice. Future interventions should consider a variety of exercise and physical activity opportunities for older adults.

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Collaborative Evaluation of Individual and Team Performance in Training and Match Environments Using the Coach Logic Online Platform

Don Vinson, Kelvin Beeching, Michelle Morgan, and Gareth Jones

Sports coaches’ commonly have a limited appreciation of pedagogy (Light & Evans, 2013). Furthermore, investigations concerning coaches’ use of performance analysis for athlete learning are rare (Groom, Cushion, & Nelson, 2011). Complex Learning Theory (CLT) advocates nonlinear and sociocultural educative approaches (Light, 2013). Considering this digital age, the aim of this investigation was to examine coaches’ use of Coach Logic—an online video-based coaching platform. Seven Head Coaches (five rugby union and two field hockey) were interviewed individually whilst their coaching staff and players contributed to group interviews. Results confirmed a priori themes of active, social and interpretive as derived from CLT. Analysis of these findings established that online coaching platforms have the capacity to facilitate the active involvement of athletes in the process of performance analysis. From a social perspective, online coaching platforms have helped to develop a positive team environment and also interpersonal working. Good practice was evident relating to interpretive approaches; however, the potential for coaches to embrace more radical conceptualisations of knowledge acquisition is stark. Online coaching platforms have a place in contemporary team sport environments and can contribute to athlete learning and other important aspects of team culture and cohesion.

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The Efficacy of Exercise as an Intervention to Treat Recurrent Nonspecific Low Back Pain in Adolescents

Michelle Jones, Gareth Stratton, Tom Reilly, and Vishwanath Unnithan

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a specific 8-week exercise rehabilitation program as an intervention to treat recurrent nonspecific low back pain in adolescents. A randomized controlled trial involving 54 adolescents (14.6 ± 0.6 years) who suffered from recurrent nonspecific low back pain participated in either the exercise rehabilitation program or a control condition. Pre- and postintervention measures of low back pain status and biological risk indicators were taken. Two-way mixed ANOVA was conducted and significance was set at p < .01. Significant improvement was noted in the exercise rehabilitation group for perceived severity of pain (effect size 1.47) and number of occasions missing physical activity (effect size 0.99). Significant improvement in the exercise rehabilitation group for sit-and-reach performance, hip range of motion, lumbar sagittal mobility (modified Schöber), and number of sit-ups in 60 s were also identified. In conclusion, the specific exercise program appeared to provide positive benefits for adolescents suffering from recurrent nonspecific low back pain. Further evaluation is required to evaluate the effectiveness of the exercise rehabilitation program in relation to other interventions and to assess the long-term effectiveness.

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In This Issue

Edited by Gareth R. Jones and Anthony A. Vandervoort

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New Face and Faces for the Journal of Aging and Physical Activity

Edited by Anthony A. Vandervoort and Gareth R. Jones

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Creating Ethical Decision Makers: The Influence of Education on Perceptions of Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault

Elizabeth A. Taylor, Gareth J. Jones, Kristy McCray, and Robin Hardin

The sport industry is ripe for issues of sexual harassment/assault due to the high value placed on masculine characteristics and the power differential between male leaders/coaches and female subordinates/athletes. This culture permeates sport organizations, as issues of sexual harassment/assault committed by athletes and coaches/administrators are commonplace and have recently been mishandled, raising questions about effective education. This study examined the relationship between education on sexual harassment/assault and the endorsement of rape myths by sport management students. Results indicate that training on sexual harassment/assault in sport management classrooms is low and is potentially ineffective at curbing rape myth acceptance, suggesting current curricula are insufficient. These findings have both theoretical and practical contributions related to how sport management departments can prepare future professionals to change the culture of sport.

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Does Yoga Engender Fitness in Older Adults? A Critical Review

Kaitlyn P. Roland, Jennifer M. Jakobi, and Gareth R. Jones

Interest in yoga is growing, especially among older adults. This review critically summarizes the current literature to investigate whether physical fitness and function benefits are engendered through the practice of yoga in older adults. A comprehensive search yielded 507 studies; 10 studies with 544 participants (69.6 ± 6.3 yr, 71% female) were included. Large variability in yoga styles and measurement outcomes make it challenging to interpret results across studies. Studies reported moderate improvements for gait (ES = 0.54, 0.80), balance (ES = 0.25–1.61), upper/lower body flexibility (ES = 0.25, 0.70), lower body strength (ES = 0.51), and weight loss (ES = 0.73, 0.99). Yoga may engender improvements in some components of fitness in older adults. However, more evidence is needed to determine its effectiveness as an alternative exercise to promote fitness in older adults. Further investigation into yoga as an exercise activity for older adults is warranted.

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The Phone-FITT: A Brief Physical Activity Interview for Older Adults

Dawn P. Gill, Gareth R. Jones, GuangYong Zou, and Mark Speechley

The purpose of this study was to develop a brief physical activity interview for older adults (Phone-FITT) and evaluate its test–retest reliability and validity. Summary scores were derived for household, recreational, and total PA. Reliability was evaluated in a convenience sample from a fall-prevention study (N = 43, 79.4 ± 2.9 years, 51% male), and validity, in a random sample of individuals in older adult exercise programs (N = 48, 77.4 ± 4.7 years, 25% male). Mean time to complete the Phone-FITT was 10 min for participants sampled from exercise programs. Evaluation of test–retest reliability indicated substantial to almost perfect agreement for all scores, with intraclass correlation coefficients (95% confidence intervals) ranging from .74 (.58–.85) to .88 (.8–.94). For validity, Spearman’s rho correlations of Phone-FITT scores with accelerometer counts ranged from .29 (.01–.53) to .57 (.34–.73). Correlations of Phone-FITT recreational scores with age and seconds to complete a self-paced step test ranged from –.29 (–.53 to –.01) to –.45 (–.68 to –.14). This study contributes preliminary evidence of the reliability and validity of the Phone-FITT.

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Great Expectations: A Critical Review of Interorganizational Relationships in Amateur Sport

Katie E. Misener, Kathy Babiak, Gareth Jones, and Iain Lindsey

The study of interorganizational relationships in amateur sport has developed significantly over the past 30 years alongside rising expectations for multisector integration between sport organizations and other partners. This stems from sport organizations seeking innovative ways to achieve their mission and neoliberal government policies adding institutional pressure for interorganizational cooperation. This review paper discusses the wider cultural and political forces that shape the drive for legitimacy through partnerships across sector boundaries and outlines the theoretical influences on interorganizational relationship research in amateur sport between economic and behavioral paradigms. In addition to considering how prevailing frameworks and findings inform the current body of knowledge in sport management, we critically reflect on implicit assumptions underpinning this work given that partnerships now saturate the discourse of sport management policy and practice. Our review questions whether reality lines up with our “great expectations,” and explores what limitations and opportunities remain for future interorganizational relationships research in amateur sport.