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Glenna G. Bower

Women continue to be underrepresented in leadership positions within sport. As the number of women entering sport increases, a growing number of professionals recognize the inherent benefits of the mentoring relationship across a range of professional settings including sport (Bower, Hums, & Keedy, 2006; Grappendorf, Burton, & Lilienthal, 2007). Unfortunately, mentors are not always a viable option for women wanting to advance within leadership positions in sport. A primary reason for limited opportunities is the shortage of female in leadership positions within sport organizations creating a dearth of potential female mentors (Weaver & Chelladurai, 2002). Therefore, this paper explored the dynamics of the mentoring relationship between one professional organization (NAGWS) and potential career outcomes for women in sport. Specifically, how does NAGWS use group mentoring initiatives for girls and women in sport which may lead to potential advancement opportunities?’

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Glenna G. Bower

While scholars have focused their attention on women working in management positions within several segments of the sport industry, limited research has been done within the health and fitness industry. The purpose of this study provided career path information and advice to women pursuing a management position within the health and fitness industry. The participants were 480female managers who were distributed the Career Paths of Women in Sports Survey in eliciting responses related to their career paths and career advice. Means were calculated for the quantitative data. A three-step content-analytic procedure was used to analyze the qualitative data. The practical information focused on women climbing the ladder from an entry-level position to the management position they are in today. Career advice included, but was not limited to, continuing education, staying up-to-date on certifications, gaining practical experience, networking, and obtaining a mentor.

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Glenna G. Bower

This study introduced mentor characteristics and advancement techniques deemed necessary in developing a successful mentoring relationship with women within the health and fitness industry. The successful mentoring relationship may lead to the advancement of women within leadership positions in the health and fitness industry. The participants included 480 female members of the ACSM Health and Fitness Alliance. The study addressed characteristics of the mentor and advancement techniques. These two areas of inquiry provided implications for female protégés seeking to enter a successful mentoring relationship with a mentor in the health and fitness industry.

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Glenna G. Bower and Mary A. Hums

The purpose of this study was to explore the reasons for mentoring women to advance within leadership positions as international physical educators. The study focused on the following within international physical education departments: (a) individual reasons for mentoring women, (b) organizational factors that inhibit or facilitate the ability to mentor women, (c) protégé characteristics that attract mentors to women protégés, and (d) outcomes associated with mentoring women. A phenomenological research design was chosen to examine the mentoring relationship. A group of women from a wide variety of colleges and universities were con at the International Association of Physical Education and Sport for Girls and Women (IAPESGW) conference (N = 5). The primary means of collecting data were in-depth interviews. A constant comparative analysis was used throughout the study. The study provided valuable information for mentors wanting to find ways to successfully mentor women to advance within leadership positions as interna academic physical educators.

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Athena Yiamouyiannis, Glenna G. Bower, Joanne Williams, Dina Gentile and Heather Alderman

Accreditation and accountability in sport management education are necessary to ensure academic rigor and can serve as vehicles by which sport management educators examine and enhance the academic quality of their programs. This paper addresses this topic first with a discussion of the need for accreditation and a review of the accrediting agencies and other entities involved (CHEA, USDE, regional and specialized accrediting agencies, and state involvement). Next is a brief overview of COSMA’s accreditation process, and then a focus on direct learning outcomes and assessment tools. Becoming more familiar with the value and purpose of accreditation in general, as well as the specifics of the COSMA accreditation process as it relates to the common professional components (CPCs) and direct learning outcome assessments, can help with obtaining faculty commitment to the accreditation process and with continued enhancement of the academic quality of sport management programs.

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Marion E. Hambrick, Mary A. Hums, Glenna G. Bower and Eli A. Wolff

Elite athletes require the most advanced sports equipment to maintain their competitive edge, but manufacturers cannot always satisfy these athletes’ specific equipment needs. Sport involvement can influence sports-equipment selections and is described as the process by which individuals rely on attitudes and belief systems to make sports-related consumption decisions. This study involved semistructured interviews with 5 elite Parasport athletes to identify and analyze the role of sport involvement in their selection of sports equipment. The results revealed that the athletes identified product limitations, created a collaborative environment, and promoted a culture of innovation to develop new sports products and address existing limitations. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.