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Mike Sleap, Barbara Elliott, Martha Paisi and Helen Reed

Background:

There are concerns about the future health of young people due to inactive lifestyles. However, evidence about their physical activity levels is not extensive, especially with regard to affluent young people. This study aimed to investigate whether young people from affluent backgrounds met public health recommendations for physical activity.

Methods:

Diary accounts of lifestyle activity were collected from 219 students ages 9 to 15 y attending a fee-paying school in England.

Results:

Pupils spent an average of 121 min per day participating in physical activities of at least moderate intensity, considerably more than public health recommendations of 60 min per day. However, almost a quarter of these young people engaged in less than 60 min of physical activity per day of at least moderate intensity.

Conclusions:

The picture to emerge was one of a balance between sedentary pursuits like television and homework and physical activities such as sport and active play.

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Holly R. Wyatt, John C. Peters, George W. Reed, Gary K. Grunwald, Mary Barry, Helen Thompson, Joanie Jones and James O. Hill

Background:

Obesity is an epidemic in the United States, yet few programs have been implemented on a widespread basis to deal with it. Colorado on the Move is a state-wide program with a specific quantifiable behavioral goal for increasing lifestyle physical activity (i.e. walking) and decreasing energy intake to prevent weight gain.

Methods:

A nonrandomized intervention trial designed to increase walking by 2000 steps/d using electronic step counters.

Results:

The intervention was effective in increasing average steps/d by at least 2000 over a 14-wk period.

Conclusion:

The Colorado on the Move intervention was effective in significantly increasing physical activity over a 14-wk period. Steps/d appears to be a good target for use in interventions to increase physical activity. Simply increasing physical activity in the population by 2000 steps/d could help in preventing the average yearly increase in body weight seen in the US population.