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  • Author: J. Craig Garrison x
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J. Craig Garrison, Joe M. Hart, Riann M. Palmieri, D. Casey Kerrigan and Christopher D. Ingersoll

Context:

Although kinematic analyses are helpful in describing movement differences between genders, kinetic data might further explain the predisposing factors contributing to potential injury during athletic landing maneuvers.

Objective:

To determine whether there are differences in knee moments between male and female varsity college soccer players during a single-leg landing.

Design:

Preexperimental with static group comparison.

Setting:

Motion-analysis laboratory.

Participants:

16 varsity college soccer players (8 men, 8 women).

Intervention:

Subjects performed 5 single-leg landings from a height of 60 cm.

Main Outcome Measures:

Peak internal rotation, valgus, varus, and extension knee moments calculated from raw ground-reaction forces and kinematic data.

Results:

Significant gender differences were present (P = .020), with men exhibiting 31% greater mean peak knee-varus moments than women when landing on a single leg from 60 cm (P = .020).

Conclusions:

Male soccer players demonstrate greater knee-varus moments than female soccer players during single-leg landing. This might be valuable in designing clinical treatment and prevention programs for ACL injuries.

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J. Craig Garrison, Joe M. Hart, Riann M. Palmieri, D. Casey Kerrigan and Christopher D. Ingersoll

Context:

Gender differences in muscle activity during landing have been studied as a possible contributing factor to the greater incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in women.

Objective:

To compare root-mean-square (RMS) electromyography (EMG) of selected lower extremity muscles at initial contact (IC) and at peak knee internal-rotation (IR) moment in men and women during landing.

Design:

Preexperimental design static-group comparison.

Setting:

Motion-analysis laboratory.

Participants:

16 varsity college soccer players (8 men, 8 women).

Main Outcome Measures:

EMG activity of the gluteus medius, lateral hamstrings, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris during landing.

Results:

When RMS EMG of all muscles was considered simultaneously, no significant differences were detected between genders at IC or at peak knee IR moment.

Conclusion:

Male and female college soccer players display similar relative muscle activities of the lower extremity during landing. Gender landing-control parameters might vary depending on the technique used to analyze muscle activity.

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Adam Culiver, J. Craig Garrison, Kalyssa M. Creed, John E. Conway, Shiho Goto and Sherry Werner

Context: Numerous studies have reported kinematic data on baseball pitchers using three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis, but no studies to date have correlated this data with clinical outcome measures. Objective: To examine the relationship among Y-Balance Test–Lower Quarter (YBT-LQ) composite scores, musculoskeletal characteristics of the hip, and pitching kinematics in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I baseball pitchers. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: 3D motion analysis laboratory. Participants: Nineteen healthy male college baseball pitchers. Main Outcome Measures: Internal and external hip passive range of motion, hip abduction strength, YBT-LQ composite scores, and kinematic variables of the pitching motion. Results: Stride length demonstrated a moderate positive correlation with dominant limb YBT-LQ composite score (r = .524, P = .02) and nondominant limb YBT-LQ composite score (r = .550, P = .01), and a weak positive correlation with normalized time to maximal humerus velocity (r = .458, P = .04). Stride length had a moderate negative correlation with normalized time to maximal thorax velocity (r = −.522, P = .02) and dominant hip total rotational motion (TRM; r = −.660, P = .002), and had a strong negative correlation with normalized time from stride foot contact to maximal knee flexion (r = −.722, P < .001). Dominant limb YBT-LQ composite score had a weak negative correlation with hip abduction strength difference (r = −.459, P = .04) and normalized time to maximal thorax velocity (r = −.468, P = .04). Nondominant limb YBT-LQ composite score demonstrated a weak negative correlation with normalized time to maximal thorax velocity (r = −.450, P = .05) and had a moderate negative correlation with dominant hip TRM (r = −.668, P = .001). There were no other significant relationships between the remaining variables. Conclusions: YBT-LQ is a clinical measure that can be used to correlate with hip musculoskeletal characteristics and pitching kinematics in NCAA Division I pitchers.

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Joseph M. Hart, J. Craig Garrison, Riann Palmieri-Smith, D. Casey Kerrigan and Christopher D. Ingersoll

Context:

Lower extremity kinetics while performing a single-leg forward jump landing may help explain gender biased risk for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury.

Objective:

Gender comparison of lower extremity joint angles and moments.

Design:

Static groups comparison.

Setting:

Motion analysis laboratory.

Patients or Other Participants:

8 male and 8 female varsity, collegiate soccer athletes.

Intervention:

5 single-leg landings from a 100cm forward jump.

Main Outcome Measures:

Peak and initial contact external joint moments and joint angles of the ankle, knee, and hip.

Results:

At initial heel contact, males exhibited a adduction moment whereas females exhibited a abduction moment at the hip. Females also had significantly less peak hip extension moment and significantly less peak hip internal rotation moment than males had. Females exhibited greater knee adduction and hip internal rotation angles than men did.

Conclusions:

When decelerating from a forward jump, gender differences exist in forces acting at the hip.

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Joseph Hannon, J. Craig Garrison, Sharon Wang-Price, Shiho Goto, Angellyn Grondin, James Bothwell and Curtis Bush

Context: Joint loading following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) is thought to influence long-term outcomes. However, our understanding of the role of meniscus repair at the time of ACL-R on early joint loading is limited. Objective: To assess if differences in total energy absorption and energy absorption contribution of the hip, knee, and ankle exist in the early stages of rehabilitation between patients who received an isolated ACL-R and those with concomitant meniscal repairs. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Clinical laboratory. Patients: Fifty-nine human subjects, including 27 who underwent ACL-R and 32 who underwent ACL-R with concomitant meniscal repairs. Main Outcome Measure: The total energy absorption and the energy absorption contribution of each joint of both the involved and uninvolved limbs during a double-limb squat task. Results: There were significant differences in energy absorption contribution between groups at the knee joint (P = .01) and the hip joint (P = .04), but not at the ankle joint (P = .48) of the involved limb. Post hoc analysis indicates that preoperative hip and knee loading differences exist and when you control for preoperative loading (analysis of covariance), the postsurgery difference was not significant. Conclusions: The results of the study suggest that the additional surgical procedure of MR may not have had negative effects on joint loading during squatting at 12 weeks.