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  • Author: J. Larry Durstine x
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Katrina D. DuBose, Cheryl L. Addy, Barbara E. Ainsworth, Gregory A. Hand and J. Larry Durstine

Background:

This study was performed to determine the relationship between leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and the metabolic syndrome (MS) in 16,681 adults (43 ± 0.44 y) enrolled in NHANES III.

Methods:

LTPA was classified as regularly active ( 5 d/wk moderate and/or 3 d/wk vigorous), irregularly active (some LTPA), or inactive (no LTPA). The MS was positive with three or more conditions: 1) abdominal obesity, 2) low HDL-C, 3) hypertriglyceridemia, 4) elevated blood pressure, or 5) elevated glucose. Logistic regression examined the relationship between LTPA and the MS, adjusting for age, race, smoking status, and educational attainment stratified by gender.

Results:

In men only, irregular activity and inactivity was related to an increase in the MS (irregular: OR = 1.52 95% CI 1.11, 1.23; inactive: OR = 1.60, 95% CI 1.18, 1.98; test for trend P = 0.004). Inactivity increased the odds for abdominal obesity (P < 0.05).

Conclusions:

LTPA levels might influence the development of MS and abdominal obesity.

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Patti L. Williams, Roger G. Sargent, Robert F. Valois, J. Wanzer Drane, Deborah M. Parra-Medina and Larry J. Durstine

This study is an examination of eating behaviors and body image concerns among 587 female collegiate athletes from nine colleges/universities representing 14 different sports. Measures included the Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2), the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26), and a questionnaire gathering general demographic information, reasons for dieting and/or using other methods of weight control, as well as information about expressed concerns from others regarding the respondents weight. Three sport groups were hypothesized to be at increased risk: athletes whose performance is subjectively scored; athletes who compete in a sport where a low body weight is considered advantageous; and athletes who must wear body conrevealing clothing. Chi-Square and Logistic Regression analyses revealed no association between these sport groups and the presence of a subclinical eating disorder (SED). Additional analyses determined no statistical association between student-athletes competing at the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I level (versus Division II or III level) or student-athletes who were scholarship recipients (versus non-scholarship recipients) and the presence of SED. Student-athletes who have heard expressed concerns from others regarding their body weight were significantly more likely to report the presence of SED (p < .0001). Therefore, special care should be taken with all student-athletes when discussing body weight.