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James O. Davis

Jetting across several time zones can attenuate the performance of athletes as well as markedly reduce comfort. Circadian disorganization occurs because, while some adaptation is controlled by external factors such as light and social activity, other adaptations must wait for internal clocks to slowly synchronize. To advise athletes how best to adapt to jeg lag, the sport psychologist must consider many variables such as distance traveled and direction of flight, and choose among options such as education of the athlete and strategies for improving reentrainment.

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James O. Davis

Several studies report that psychological factors, especially stress, are related to sports injuries, and while stress management techniques have often been found to facilitate sport performance, these reports have not included information about the effects of stress intervention on injury rates. This article reexamines two sport psychology programs by investigating the injury data collected by athletic training personnel before, during, and after two university varsity teams practiced progressive relaxation during team workouts. Major findings include a 52% reduction in injuries for swimmers and a 33% reduction in serious injuries for football players. Discussion focuses on methods of injury data collection by sport psychologists, questions about the nature of the stress/injury relationship, and possible interventions.