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  • Author: James R. Morrow Jr x
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James R. Morrow Jr. and Patty S. Freedson

This review summarizes the research relating physical activity to aerobic fitness among adolescents. A brief description of commonly used physical activity and aerobic fitness measures is presented, followed by an interpretation of the literature that suggests a small to moderate relationship between physical activity and aerobic fitness in this population (typical correlation of .16-17). Dose-response data are lacking, which makes it difficult to offer definitive conclusions concerning the amount of physical activity necessary to elicit change in aerobic capacity. Nevertheless, recommendations about the type, amount, and quality of physical activity for adolescents are presented. Recommendations are based on a summary of the research data on daily physical activity and aerobic fitness in adolescents. Further research is needed to investigate the association between habitual physical activity and aerobic fitness in adolescents where the a priori goal is to identify a threshold of daily physical activity necessary for an aerobic benefit associated with enhanced health.

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Steven N. Blair and James R. Morrow Jr.

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James R. Morrow Jr. and Steven N. Blair

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James R. Morrow Jr. and Steven N. Blair

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Noreen L. Goggin and James R. Morrow Jr.

The purpose of this study was to determine older adults’ physical activity behaviors and stage of readiness for physical activity. Data were collected on 403 American adults over the age of 60. Of these participants, 206 were aged 61–70 and 197 were over the age of 70. Participants first provided information regarding their perceptions of the benefits of physical activity. Then questions were asked to determine their stage of readiness for physical activity (i.e., precontemplation, contemplation, etc.). Results indicated that older adults are aware of the health benefits of physical activity (89%), but 69% of them are not participating in sufficient physical activity to obtain such benefits. Physical activity involvement decreases with increased age, and older men tend to be more physically active than older women. Increased knowledge about the benefits of physical activity and one’s stage of readiness for it might help increase the number of older adults who engage in sufficient physical activity.

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James R. Morrow Jr. and Steven N. Blair

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James R. Morrow Jr. and Steven N. Blair

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Elizabeth Y. Brown, James R. Morrow Jr. and Stephen M. Livingston

The purpose of the present study was to determine if completion of a 14-week conditioning course affected the physical and total self-concepts of college-age women. Analysis of variance was used to contrast experimental and control groups of 50 subjects each on selected subscales of the Tennessee Self Concept Scale. Results indicated that the women showed significant differences in self-concept upon completion of the conditioning program; however, effects were not generalizable to all dimensions of self-concept. Implications are that training programs may be beneficial in their impact on selected aspects of the self-concept of women as well as the physiological parameters typically affected by conditioning programs. Self-concept profiles are developed for those women who entered the program as well as for those who completed the program.