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  • Author: Jason C. Gillette x
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Catherine A. Stevermer and Jason C. Gillette

Variation in the timing indicators separating sit-to-stand (STS) into movement phases complicates both research comparisons and clinical applications. The purpose of this study was to use kinetic reference standards to identify accurate kinematic and kinetic indicators for STS movement analysis such that consistent indicators might be used for STS from varied initial postures. Healthy adults performed STS using 4 foot placements: foot-neutral, foot-back, right-staggered, and left-staggered. Kinetic and kinematic data were collected from force platforms and an 8-camera video system. Initiation, seat-off, vertical posture, and termination were detected with 5% start and 7.5% end thresholds for changes in kinetic and kinematic STS indicators. Timing differences between kinetic and kinematic indicator time points and the reference vertical seated reaction force end point (seatoff) were determined. Kinematic indicators were compared with selected kinetic indicators using timing differences, statistical similarity, and internal consistency measures. Our results suggest that a single force platform system measuring vertical GRF or a simple camera system to evaluate the shoulder marker position and velocity can accurately and consistently detect STS initiation, seat-off, and vertical posture. In addition, these suggested STS indicators for initiation, seat-off, and vertical posture were not dependent upon foot placement.

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Chen Deng, Jason C. Gillette and Timothy R. Derrick

A detailed understanding of the hip loading environment is needed to help prevent hip fractures, minimize hip pain, rehabilitate hip injuries, and design osteogenic exercises for the hip. The purpose of this study was to compare femoral neck stress during stair ascent and descent and to identify the contribution of muscles and reaction forces to the stress environment in mature adult subjects (n = 17; age: 50–65 y). Motion analysis and inverse dynamics were combined with musculoskeletal modeling and optimization, then used as input to an elliptical femoral neck cross-sectional model to estimate femoral neck stress. Peak stress values at the 2 peaks of the bimodal stress curves (stress vs time plot) were compared between stair ascent and descent. Stair ascent had greater compressive stress than descent during the first peak at the anterior (ascent: −18.0 [7.9] MPa, descent: −12.9 [5.4] MPa, P < .001) and posterior (ascent: −34.4 [10.9] MPa, descent: −27.8 [10.1] MPa, P < .001) aspects of the femoral neck cross section. Stair descent had greater tensile stress during both peaks at the superior aspect (ascent: 1.3 [7.0] MPa, descent: 24.8 [9.7] MPa, peak 1: P < .001; ascent: 15.7 [6.1] MPa, descent: 18.0 [8.4] MPa, peak 2: P = .03) and greater compressive stress during the second peak at the inferior aspect (ascent: −43.8 [9.7] MPa, descent: −51.1 [14.3] MPa, P = .004). Understanding this information can provide a more comprehensive view of bone loading at the femoral neck for older population.

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Boyi Dai, Christopher J. Sorensen, Timothy R. Derrick and Jason C. Gillette

The effects of training on biomechanical risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries have been investigated, but the effects of detraining have received little attention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a one-month postseason break on knee biomechanics and lower extremity electromyography (EMG) during a stop-jump task. A postseason break is the phase between two seasons when no regular training routines are performed. Twelve NCAA female volleyball players participated in two stop-jump tests before and after the postseason break. Knee kinematics, kinetics, quadriceps EMG, and hamstring EMG were assessed. After one month of postseason break, the players demonstrated significantly decreased jump height, decreased initial knee flexion angle, decreased knee flexion angle at peak anterior tibial resultant force, decreased prelanding vastus lateralis EMG, and decreased prelanding biceps femoris EMG as compared with prebreak. No significant differences were observed for frontal plane biomechanics and quadriceps and hamstring landing EMG between prebreak and postbreak. Although it is still unknown whether internal ACL loading changes after a postseason break, the more extended knee movement pattern may present an increased risk factor for ACL injuries.

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Jason C. Gillette, Catherine A. Stevermer, Stacey A. Meardon, Timothy R. Derrick and Charles V. Schwab

Farm youth commonly perform animal care tasks such as feeding and watering. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of age, bucket size, loading symmetry, and amount of load on upper body moments during carrying tasks. Fifty-four male and female participants in four age groups (8–10 years, 12–14 years, 15–17 years, and adults, 20–26 years) participated in the study. Conditions included combinations of large or small bucket sizes, unilateral or bilateral loading, and load levels of 10% or 20% of body weight (BW). During bucket carrying, elbow flexion, shoulder flexion, shoulder abduction, shoulder external rotation, L5/S1 extension, L5/S1 lateral bending, and L5/S1 axial rotation moments were estimated using video data. The 8–10 year-old group did not display higher proportional joint moments as compared with adults. Decreasing the load from 20% BW to 10% BW significantly decreased maximum normalized elbow flexion, shoulder flexion, shoulder abduction, shoulder external rotation, L5/S1 lateral bending, and L5/S1 axial rotation moments. Carrying the load bilaterally instead of unilaterally also significantly reduced these six maximum normalized joint moments. In addition, modifying the carrying task by using smaller one-gallon buckets produced significant reductions in maximum L5/S1 lateral bending moments.

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Jason C. Gillette, Catherine A. Stevermer, Ross H. Miller, W. Brent Edwards and Charles V. Schwab

Farm youth often carry loads that are proportionally large and/or heavy, and field measurements have determined that these tasks are equivalent to industrial jobs with high injury risks. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of age, load amount, and load symmetry on lower extremity joint moments during carrying tasks. Three age groups (8–10 years, 12–14 years, adults), three load amounts (0%, 10%, 20% BW), and three load symmetry levels (unilateral large bucket, unilateral small bucket, bilateral small buckets) were tested. Inverse dynamics was used to determine maximum ankle, knee, and hip joint moments. Ankle dorsiflexion, ankle inversion, ankle eversion, knee adduction, and hip extension moments were significantly higher in 8–10 and 12–14 year olds. Ankle plantar flexion, ankle inversion, knee extension, and hip extension moments were significantly increased at 10% and 20% BW loads. Knee and hip adduction moments were significantly increased at 10% and 20% BW loads when carrying a unilateral large bucket. Of particular concern are increased ankle inversion and eversion moments for children, along with increased knee and hip adduction moments for heavy, asymmetrical carrying tasks. Carrying loads bilaterally instead of unilaterally avoided increases in knee and hip adduction moments with increased load amount.

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Ross H. Miller, Stacey A. Meardon, Timothy R. Derrick and Jason C. Gillette

Previous research has proposed that a lack of variability in lower extremity coupling during running is associated with pathology. The purpose of the study was to evaluate lower extremity coupling variability in runners with and without a history of iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS) during an exhaustive run. Sixteen runners ran to voluntary exhaustion on a motorized treadmill while a motion capture system recorded reflective marker locations. Eight runners had a history of ITBS. At the start and end of the run, continuous relative phase (CRP) angles and CRP variability between strides were calculated for key lower extremity kinematic couplings. The ITBS runners demonstrated less CRP variability than controls in several couplings between segments that have been associated with knee pain and ITBS symptoms, including tibia rotation–rearfoot motion and rearfoot motion–thigh ad/abduction, but more variability in knee flexion/extension–foot ad/abduction. The ITBS runners also demonstrated low variability at heel strike in coupling between rearfoot motion–tibia rotation. The results suggest that runners prone to ITBS use abnormal segmental coordination patterns, particular in couplings involving thigh ad/abduction and tibia internal/external rotation. Implications for variability in injury etiology are suggested.