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Jerome Quarterman

The purpose of this investigation was twofold: (a) to identify age, gender, educational background, athletic playing experience, teaching experience, coaching experience, and administrative experience of athletic directors (ADs) of historically black colleges and universities {HBCUs), and (b) to compare these data with data collected in previous studies on ADs of predominantly white colleges and universities. A 20-item questionnaire was designed, and copies were mailed to the 80 ADs of the HBCUs listed in the 1988-1989 National Directory of College Athletics. Fifty-five (68.8%) ADs returned the questionnaire; of these, 53 were black males, 1 was a black female, and 1 was a white male. Although the results revealed that ADs of HBCUs possessed many of the characteristics of ADs of predominantly white colleges and universities, there were differences found between the ADs of this study and those of earlier studies: (a) ADs of HBCUs were, on the average, 5 years younger in age, (b) a higher percentage of ADs of HBCUs held master's and doctorate degrees, (c) a higher percentage of ADs of HBCUs currently had teaching and/or coaching responsibilities, and (d) the median salary ranges were lower for ADs of HBCUs than for ADs of predominantly white colleges and universities. As was the case in earlier studies, few ADs held degrees in sport administration,

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Jerome Quarterman

Using Mintzberg's managerial role model, this study examined the managerial role profiles of 63 intercollegiate athletic conference commissioners. Results showed that the subjects rated the disseminator role as most important, followed by the liaison, disturbance handler, monitor, leader, entrepreneur, spokesperson, figurehead, negotiator, and resource allocator role behaviors. Membership in NCAA divisions did not significantly affect these ratings.

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Jerome Quarterman

The purpose of this investigation was to assess the perceptions of intercollegiate athletics conference commissioners regarding skills associated with management and leadership. A descriptive survey design was used to collect the data. The study showed that commissioners (N = 75) of NCAA Division I, II, and III conferences rated skills associated with management higher than those associated with leadership (f[l,69] = 5.109, p = .0001). Based on a 5-point Likert scale, the survey concluded: (a) Overall mean rates for management (M = 3.61, SD = .680) were higher than for leadership (M = 3.28, SD = .636), and (b) mean rates for both management and leadership were above average (M = 3.00). Serendipitously, the skills of management and leadership were discovered to be associated with brain hemisphere and whole brain thinking. The investigation's findings may serve as a guide for further research on management and leadership of intercollegiate athletic administrators.

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Jerome Quarterman, Geraldine Harris and Rose M. Chew

The present investigation examined how African American students rated the values of the basic instructional physical education activity program at two historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) based on a 24-item questionnaire. Descriptive data indicated that the students rated keeping in good health and physical condition as the most important value. A principal component factor analysis with varimax rotation revealed five underlying factors that appeared related to (a) physical self-efficacy, (b) a commitment to lifelong participation, (c) health-related physical fitness, (d) health/aesthetic benefits, and (e) social benefits. Physical self-efficacy appeared to be the most significant, accounting for the largest portion of the explained variance. African American female students placed more emphasis on health/aesthetic benefits, and African American male students placed emphasis on the social benefits. Overall, results of the present investigation generally appeared consistent with findings of earlier studies conducted at predominantly white Colleges and universities.