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  • Author: Jessica M. Tullar x
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Timothy J. Walker, Jessica M. Tullar, Pamela M. Diamond, Harold W. Kohl III and Benjamin C. Amick III

Background: There is a need to understand physical activity types associated with health-related work limitations (also known as presenteeism). This study tests whether additive effects between physical activity types are associated with health-related work limitations among employees from a public university system. Methods: A cross-sectional study using health assessment data (n = 10,791) was used to examine aims. Analysis of covariance models tested differences in work limitations between physical activity groups based on combinations of stretching behavior, aerobic, and muscle-strengthening physical activities. Planned contrasts compared differences between selected groups. Results: There were significant group differences (P < .001) in reported work limitations after controlling for demographic, season, and health-related variables. Employees who reported participating in aerobic physical activity had significantly lower work limitation levels compared with inactive employees (P = .027). Employees who reported participating in both aerobic and muscle-strengthening physical activities had the lowest work limitation levels compared with all groups and significantly lower work limitation levels compared with employees who participated in aerobic physical activity only (P = .026). Conclusions: Results provide evidence of an additive effect where participating in a combination of aerobic and muscle-strengthening physical activities may be most beneficial when targeting health-related work limitations.