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Melinda A. Solmon, Terry Worthy and Jo A. Carter

The interactive model views the teacher as a powerful socializing agent and establishes links between biographical characteristics and the demands of different contexts. This study describes the dynamic interaction of factors related to teacher role identity and school context. Specifically the goal was to employ case studies to examine the biographies of three first-year teachers to determine how individual perception of the teaching role impacts professional development during the first year of teaching. Using subject interviews, field notes, lesson plans, student performance data, and informal interviews with administrators and coworkers, a comparison was made between the cases to learn how the teaching perspectives of first-year teachers interact with school contexts. Results support the notion that the beginning teacher can be an active agent in controlling the direction of biography and social structures in the socialization process.

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Amelia M. Lee, Jo A. Carter and Ping Xiang

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Amelia M. Lee, Dennis K. Landin and Jo A. Carter

Thirty fourth-grade students were provided two 30-min lessons on the tennis forehand ground stroke. The students and the teacher were videotaped, and, following each lesson, the students were interviewed using a stimulated-recall procedure. Frequency measures of successful practice trials were also coded for each student during each practice session. Analysis revealed a significant positive relationship between skill-related thoughts and successful performance during class. The findings support the notion that student thoughts are important mediators between instruction and student response patterns.

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Melinda A. Solmon, Terry Worthy, Amelia M. Lee and Jo A. Carter

This investigation examined the teaching perspectives of student teachers and described the interplay between their role identities and teaching contexts. Principal findings were (a) investigators were able to describe definable characteristics of teacher role identity and assess the relative strength of the role based on clarity of teacher image and level of confidence, (b) interaction patterns were observable and varied according to individual teacher and context, (c) subjects with stronger TRIs were able to negotiate for and closely approximate a real teaching role by implementing their own style, and (d) subjects with weaker TRIs relied heavily on their cooperating teachers by mimicking their teaching styles and routines. In conclusion, the findings of this study support the view of the prospective teacher as an active agent in controlling the direction of biography and social structure in the socialization process.