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John Horne

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John Horne

The tendency in discussions of media consumption in the past decade has been to move away from political economy or the “production of consumption” perspective; it has been accompanied by a growing interest in the active audience, symbolic culture, and textual analysis. Though sport and the mass media are a popular research topic in English-language publications, the major focus has been on a narrow range of advanced capitalist economies. This article on the relationship between the mass media and sport in Japan takes issue with both these emphases and contributes to on-going debates about sport, the media, and the commodification of popular culture. First, it provides a sketch of episodes in the development of the mass media in Japan—especially the newspaper press, radio, and television—in conjunction with that of sport. The focal point is the involvement of business corporations in the development of relations between professional sport and the mass media and the underlying commercial logic that steers that development. Second, by focusing on Japanese examples, the article provides additional empirical data so that similarities and contrasts can be drawn among existing accounts of the development of mediasport in advanced capitalist countries. In particular, it is argued that much of the writing about sport and the mass media has been derived from examination of “Anglo-American” experiences. Attention to media and sport in Japan, both as an economic commodity and as a vehicle for the creation of meaningful discourse about national identity, raises questions about debates concerning sport, media, and globalization.

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John Horne

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John Horne

This paper directs attention to a sector of the press that is largely ignored by academic media research: weekly and monthly sports magazines. The birth and death of the British general sports magazine, Sportsweek, is considered as a case study from which some critical observations can be made about research into sport and the mass media on both sides of the Atlantic. The magazine industry as a whole is little discussed in mainstream media studies, even though magazines are highly significant in terms of the reproduction and sustenance of what has been called consumer culture (Featherstone, 1983, 1987; Winship, 1983). For this reason, and because most media sport research tends to focus on the textual rather than on production and appropriation, this paper outlines the economic forces shaping the consumer magazine sector in Britain and provides a comparative account of the sports magazine and press industry in the USA, Europe, and the UK. The case study of Sportsweek is considered in terms of its implications for understanding sport and leisure culture in contemporary British society.

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Jean Harvey, John Horne and Parissa Safai

Alterglobalization is the name for a large spectrum of global social movements that present themselves as supporting new forms of globalization, urging that values of democracy, justice, environmental protection, and human rights be put ahead of purely economic concerns. This article develops a framework for the study of the influence of alterglobalization on sport by: outlining a periodization of social movements and sport; proposing a typology of responses to the politics of globalization; and proposing a typology of recent social movements associated with sport. The article does not report on an empirical research project, but provides a stock take of what has happened since the 1990s regarding the politics of globalization and the politics of sport, with specific reference to global social movements. The questions raised in this article include: What form do the movements challenging the world sports order today take? Does an alterglobalization movement exist in sport? What alternative models of sport do they propose?

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Jaclyn Megan Sions, Elisa Sarah Arch and John Robert Horne

Background: Adults postamputation are not meeting physical activity recommendations. Physical activity is an important consideration in prosthetic prescription. The objective of this study was to determine if functional mobility, balance confidence, and prosthetic use are associated with physical activity among adults with a lower-limb amputation. Methods: This study recruited patients aged 18–85 years with unilateral transtibial amputations. The Cumulative Illness Rating Scale was used to determine comorbidity burden. Participants completed the Prosthetic Evaluation Questionnaire-Mobility Section, Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, and Houghton Scale of Prosthetic Use and wore a StepWatch monitor for 7 days to obtain daily step counts. Linear regression was used to evaluate relationships between each self-report measure and step counts after controlling for covariates, that is, sex, age, time since initial amputation, and comorbidity burden. Results: Forty-seven participants had ≥5 days of step data and were included in this analysis. The Prosthetic Evaluation Questionnaire-Mobility Section [mean (SD): 35.0 (9.6) points] and Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale [79.2% (15.9%)] each explained 13% of the variance in step count [5491 (4043) steps], whereas the Houghton Scale of Prosthetic Use [10.3 (1.2) points] explained 10% of the variance. Conclusion: Self-reported functional mobility, balance confidence, and prosthetic use predict short-term average daily step counts as determined from research-grade accelerometers.

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Robert S. Kossuth, John Horne, David Naze, C. Richard King, Gregory Ramshaw and Brenda A. Riemer