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lean-Xavier Guinard, Kimberly Seador, John L. Beard and Peter L. Brown

This study was undertaken to determine whether high-level training alters food choice behavior with regard to meat and dairy products because of their high fat content. Twenty male collegiate swimmers were compared to 20 male sedentary students for dietary fat intake, nutrition knowledge, and liking of meat and dairy products. There was no significant difference between the two groups for restraint, energy intake, dietary fat intake, and energy derived from fat. Nutrition knowledge, energy derived from saturated fat, and cholesterol intake, however, were significantly higher in the athletes. The two groups did not differ in their hedonic ratings of flavor or in their overall degree of liking of the meat and dairy products, and the athletes actually liked the appearance and texture of the products significantly more than did the sedentary students. This study shows that the sensory appeal of fat-containing animal products is not affected in male swimmers by a high level of exercise.

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Laura E. Murray-Kolb, John L. Beard, Lyndon J. Joseph, Stephanie L. Davey, William J. Evans and Wayne W. Campbell

Objective:

To examine the effects of resistance training on hematological and selected indices of iron status in 17 women aged 54–71 years and 18 men aged 56–69 years.

Design:

Tests and evaluations were done before and after all subjects participated in a resistance training program twice weekly for 12 weeks.

Results:

The resistance training was effective as evidenced by increases in skeletal muscle strength of 20 ± 9% and 23 ± 13% for the men and women, respectively. Hematological parameters and serum iron concentrations were within normal clinical ranges and were unchanged by resistance training for both the men and the women. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and transferrin saturation were also unaffected by resistance training in the women but were significantly affected in the men. The men showed a decreased TIBC (p < .0001) and an increased transferrin saturation (p = .050). Serum ferritin concentrations decreased significantly in the women (p = .041) but were unchanged in the men. Transferrin receptor concentrations were unaffected by resistance training in the women but increased significantly in the men (p = .030).

Conclusions:

With resistance training, iron status of older men and women changes in a sex specific way.