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Carol Biddington, Mary Popovich, Noel Kupczyk and Joni Roh

Context:

Certified athletic trainers (ATCs) must be able to manage sport-related emergencies.

Objective:

To report emergency medical services (EMS) directors’ perception of how ATCs manage emergencies and ATCs’ comfort level in managing them.

Design:

2 descriptive questionnaires.

Participants:

EMS directors (n = 64) were asked about their perceptions of ATCs’ ability to handle emergencies. ATCs (n = 224) identified their comfort level with handling emergencies.

Results:

EMS directors who had preseason meetings with ATCs had a significantly better perception of the ATCs’ ability to handle emergencies than did those who did not have preseason meetings. ATCs with advanced certifications (emergency medical technician-basic, emergency medical technician-paramedic, and automated external defibrillator) were more comfortable handling emergencies than those without.

Conclusions:

EMS directors and ATCs revealed that ATCs could manage most emergencies that might arise in athletic activities. ATCs had a higher perception of their own ability to manage emergency situations than did the EMS directors.

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Renee Newcomer Appaneal, Beverly Rockhill Levine, Frank M. Perna and Joni L. Roh

Depression is common among athletes following sport injury, yet few studies have explored the severity of postinjury depression. Among those studies, only one examined gender differences although women in the general population are more likely than men to experience depression. No research to date has used interviews to assess depression despite their standard use among mental health professionals. In a quasi-experimental design, we used a self-report checklist and a clinical interview to compare depression among male and female athletes at 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months postinjury. Results revealed significant effects of group (injured vs. control) and time (since injury), and these effects were different for the two depression measures. We also explored the sensitivity and specificity of the user-rated checklist in identifying severely depressed athletes compared with the interview. Findings underscore the importance of multimodal approaches and clinical judgment when evaluating athletes' postinjury depression symptoms.