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  • Author: Jorge L. Giraldo x
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Gloria M. Beim, Jorge L. Giraldo, Danny M. Pincivero, Matthew J. Borror and Freddie H. Fu

The purpose of this study was to compare electromyographic (EMG) activity of the abdominal muscles between the crunch exercise and five other popular abdominal exercises. Surface EMG recordings of four muscles (upper rectus, lower rectus, external oblique, and internal oblique) of the anterior abdominal wall were collected and analyzed on 20 healthy, male volunteers. EMG activity was recorded during execution of the abdominal crunch, the sit-up, and exercises performed with the Abflex machine, the AbRoller, the Nordic Track Ab Works, and the Nautilus crunch machine. The results indicate that the crunch exercise is comparable to the five other abdominal exercises with respect to muscle activation of the internal and external abdominal oblique muscles. Activation of the upper rectus abdominal muscles appears to be best achieved with the Abflex machine, whereas the crunch exercise is superior to the sit-up for activation of the upper and lower rectus abdominal muscles.

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Marc R. Safran, Christopher D. Harner, Jorge L. Giraldo, Scott M. Lephart, Paul A. Borsa and Freddie H. Fu

Proprioceptive deficits have been demonstrated following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) disruption, but little research exists evaluating proprioception in the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)-deficient and/or -reconstructed knee. We have studied proprioception in PCL-deficient and PCL-reconstructed knees. The following summarizes our protocol and results of proprioceptive testing of kinesthesia and joint position sense in participants with isolated PCL injuries and those who underwent PCL reconstruction. We studied 18 participants with isolated raptures of the PCL and 10 participants who underwent PCL reconstruction. Proprioception was evaluated by two tests: the threshold to detect passive motion (TTDPM) and the ability to passively reproduce passive positioning (RPP). These assess kinesthesia and joint position sense, respectively. We have shown that isolated PCL deficiency in the human knee does result in reduced kinesthesia and enhanced joint position sense. Thus, the proprioceptive mechanoreceptors in the PCL do appear to have some function. We further found that PCL reconstruction significantly improved kinesthesia at 45° of knee flexion, while 110° was not significantly different between the involved and uninvolved knee in both studies.