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Carmen Peiró-Velert, Pere Molina-Alventosa, David Kirk and José Devís-Devís

This paper examines teachers’ use of printed curriculum materials (PCM) during physical education (PE) instruction in Spanish secondary schools and the role they play in the enacted curriculum and in the construction of pedagogical knowledge. Three hundred and ten participants (mean age: 37.7 ± 8.7) responded to an interview-questionnaire on teachers’ pedagogical roles and tasks linked to PCM in PE. Results indicated that while PCM were used very frequently for registering students’ attendance and recording observational notes from lessons, textbooks were less and infrequently used. Both, ‘materials for data registration’ and ‘student textbook’ showed the highest and lowest level of teachers’ satisfaction, respectively. ‘Student diary’ was the PCM used more by female and less experienced teachers than their counterparts, while textbooks were used more by experienced teachers than those with less years of teaching experience. Over fifty percent of teachers considered PCM to be ‘Quite important’ because they facilitate students to study theoretical knowledge, investigate and be creative. The paper discusses the contribution of teachers’ use of PCM to the enacted curriculum and their participation in the social construction of PE knowledge through Bernstein’s theory of pedagogic device. In particular, it indicates that PE teachers are relatively independent from external agencies in curriculum development and participate in the social construction of pedagogical knowledge. Female and less experienced teachers’ use of PCM facilitated students’ participation in the construction of knowledge, which suggests weaker framing of the teaching-learning process..

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Alexandra Valencia-Peris, Joan Úbeda-Colomer, Jorge Lizandra, Carmen Peiró-Velert and José Devís-Devís

Background: Active gaming has emerged as a new option to foster physical activity in youth. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of active gaming in adolescents, to determine differences between active and nonactive gamers by type of day, and to examine predictors of being an active gamer. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted with 3095 Spanish adolescents aged 12 to 18 years who self-reported their involvement in moderate to vigorous physical activity, sedentary behaviors, and active gaming. Those engaging in active gaming for at least 10 minutes per day were considered active gamers. Student’s 2-tailed t tests, chi-square test, and binomial logistic regression were performed. Results: About 25.9% of the adolescents were active gamers. They were younger, had higher body mass index, and spent more time on moderate to vigorous physical activity, television viewing, and sedentary video games with computer/console than nonactive gamers. There were more active gamers on weekends than on weekdays. On weekdays, more males than females were active gamers. Adolescents who did not meet sleep time guidelines were more likely to be active gamers on weekdays, whereas on weekends, being a girl, overweight/obese, and having a high socioeconomic status were predictors of being an active gamer. Conclusion: Because active gaming may contribute to meeting physical activity guidelines, the present findings could enable better targeting of physical activity promotion programs.

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Alexandra Valencia-Peris, José Devís-Devís, Xavier García-Massó, Jorge Lizandra, Esther Pérez-Gimeno and Carmen Peiró-Velert

Background:

Previous research shows contradictory findings on potential competing effects between sedentary screen media usage (SMU) and physical activity (PA). This study examined these effects on adolescent girls via self-organizing maps analysis focusing on 3 target profiles.

Methods:

A sample of 1,516 girls aged 12 to 18 years self-reported daily time engagement in PA (moderate and vigorous intensity) and in screen media activities (TV/video/DVD, computer, and videogames), separately and combined.

Results:

Topological interrelationships from the 13 emerging maps indicated a moderate competing effect between physically active and sedentary SMU patterns. Higher SES and overweight status were linked to either active or inactive behaviors. Three target clusters were explored in more detail. Cluster 1, named temperate-media actives, showed capabilities of being active while engaging in a moderate level of SMU (TV/video/DVD mainly). In Cluster 2, named prudent-media inactives, and Cluster 3, compulsive-media inactives, a competing effect between SMU and PA emerged, being sedentary SMU behaviors responsible for a low involvement in active pursuits.

Conclusions:

SMU and PA emerge as both related and independent behaviors in girls, resulting in a moderate competing effect. Findings support the case for recommending the timing of PA and SMU for recreational purposes considering different profiles, sociodemographic factors and types of SMU.