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  • Author: Julia R. Casadio x
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Joseph A. McQuillan, Julia R. Casadio, Deborah K. Dulson, Paul B. Laursen and Andrew E. Kilding

Purpose: To determine the effect of NO3 consumption on measures of perception, thermoregulation, and cycling performance in hot conditions. Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, crossover design, 8 well-trained cyclists (mean ± SD age 25 ± 8 y, V˙O2 peak 64 ± 5 mL · kg−1 · min−1) performed 2 separate trials in hot (35°C, 60% relative humidity) environments, having ingested either 140 mL NO3-rich beetroot juice ∼8 mmol NO3 (NIT) or placebo (PLA) daily for 3 d with a 7-d washout period separating trials. Trials consisted of 2 × 10-min bouts at 40% and 60% peak power output (PPO) to determine physiological and perceptual responses to the heat, followed by a 4-km cycling time trial. Results: Basal [nitrite] was substantially elevated in NIT (2.70 ± 0.98 µM) vs PLA (1.10 ± 0.61 µM), resulting in a most likely (ES = 1.58 ± 0.93) increase after 3 d. There was a very likely trivial increase in rectal temperature in NIT at 40% (PLA 37.4°C ± 0.2°C vs NIT 37.5°C ± 0.3°C, 0.1°C ± 0.2°C) and 60% (PLA 37.8°C ± 0.2°C vs NIT 37.9°C ± 0.3°C, 0.1°C ± 0.2°C) PPO. Cycling performance was similar between trials (PLA 336 ± 45 W vs NIT 337 ± 50 W, CV ± 95%CL; 0.2% ± 2.5%). Outcomes for heart rate and perceptual measures were unclear across the majority of time points. Conclusions: Three days of NO3 supplementation resulted in small increases in rectal temperature during low- to moderate-intensity exercise, but this did not appear to influence 4-km cycling time-trial performance in hot climates.

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Emiel Schulze, Hein A.M. Daanen, Koen Levels, Julia R. Casadio, Daniel J. Plews, Andrew E. Kilding, Rodney Siegel and Paul B. Laursen

Purpose:

To determine the effect of thermal state and thermal comfort on cycling performance in the heat.

Methods:

Seven well-trained male triathletes completed 3 performance trials consisting of 60 min cycling at a fixed rating of perceived exertion (14) followed immediately by a 20-km time trial in hot (30°C) and humid (80% relative humidity) conditions. In a randomized order, cyclists either drank ambient-temperature (30°C) fluid ad libitum during exercise (CON), drank ice slurry (−1°C) ad libitum during exercise (ICE), or precooled with iced towels and ice slurry ingestion (15g/kg) before drinking ice slurry ad libitum during exercise (PC+ICE). Power output, rectal temperature, and ratings of thermal comfort were measured.

Results:

Overall mean power output was possibly higher in ICE (+1.4% ± 1.8% [90% confidence limit]; 0.4 > smallest worthwhile change [SWC]) and likely higher PC+ICE (+2.5% ± 1.9%; 1.5 > SWC) than in CON; however, no substantial differences were shown between PC+ICE and ICE (unclear). Time-trial performance was likely enhanced in ICE compared with CON (+2.4% ± 2.7%; 1.4 > SWC) and PC+ICE (+2.9% ± 3.2%; 1.9 > SWC). Differences in mean rectal temperature during exercise were unclear between trials. Ratings of thermal comfort were likely and very likely lower during exercise in ICE and PC+ICE, respectively, than in CON.

Conclusions:

While PC+ICE had a stronger effect on mean power output compared with CON than ICE did, the ICE strategy enhanced late-stage time-trial performance the most. Findings suggest that thermal comfort may be as important as thermal state for maximizing performance in the heat.