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Khaled Trabelsi, Kais el Abed, Stephen R. Stannard, Kamel Jammoussi, Khaled M. Zeghal and Ahmed Hakim

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of aerobic training in a fasted versus a fed state during Ramadan on body composition and metabolic parameters in physically active men. Nineteen men were allocated to 2 groups: 10 practicing aerobic training in a fasted state (FAST) and 9 training in an acutely fed state (FED) during Ramadan. All subjects visited the laboratory for a total of 4 sessions on the following occasions: 3 days before Ramadan (Bef-R), the 15th day of Ramadan; the 29th day of Ramadan (End-R), and 21 days after Ramadan. During each session, subjects underwent anthropometric measurement, completed a dietary questionnaire, and provided fasting blood and urine samples. Body weight decreased in FAST and FED by 1.9% (p < .001) and 2.6% (p = .046), respectively. Body fat percentage decreased only in FAST by 6.2% (p = .016). FAST experienced an increase in the following parameters from Bef-R to End-R: urine specific gravity (0.64%, p = .012), urea (8.7%, p < .001), creatinine (7.5%, p < .001), uric acid (12.7%, p < .001), sodium (1.9%, p = .003), chloride (2.6%, p < .001), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (27.3%, p < .001). Of these parameters, only creatinine increased (5.8%, p = .004) in FED. Creatinine clearance values of FAST decreased by 8.9% (p < .001) and by 7.6% in FED (p = .01) from Bef-R to End-R. The authors conclude that aerobic training in a fasted state lowers body weight and body fat percentage. In contrast, fed aerobic training decreases only body weight. In addition, Ramadan fasting induced change in some metabolic parameters in FAST, but these changes were absent in FED.

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Achraf Ammar, Stephen J. Bailey, Omar Hammouda, Khaled Trabelsi, Nabil Merzigui, Kais El Abed, Tarak Driss, Anita Hökelmann, Fatma Ayadi, Hamdi Chtourou, Adnen Gharbi and Mouna Turki

Purpose: The effect of playing surface on physical performance during a repeated-sprint ability (RSA) test and the mechanisms for any potential playing-surface-dependent effects on RSA performance are equivocal. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of natural grass (NG) and artificial turf (AT) on physical performance, ratings of perceived exertion, feeling scale, and blood biomarkers related to anaerobic contribution (blood lactate [Lac]), muscle damage (creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase), inflammation (C-reactive protein), and immune function (neutrophils [NEU], lymphocytes [LYM], and monocytes) in response to an RSA test. Methods: A total of 9 male professional football players from the same regional team completed 2 sessions of RSA testing (6 × 30 s interspersed with a 35-s recovery) on NG and AT in a randomized order. During the RSA test, total (sum of distances) and peak (highest distance covered in a single repetition) distance covered were determined using a measuring tape, and the decrement in sprinting performance from the first to the last repetition was calculated. Before and after the RSA test, ratings of perceived exertion, feeling scale, and Lac, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, C-reactive protein, NEU, LYM, and monocytes were recorded in both NG and AT conditions. Results: Although physical performance declined during the RSA blocks on both surfaces (P = .001), the distance covered declined more on NG (15%) than on AT (11%; P = .04; effect size [ES] = −0.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], −1.21 to 0.56) with a higher total distance covered (+6% [2%]) on AT (P = .018; ES = 1.15; 95% CI, 0.16 to 2.04). In addition, lower ratings of perceived exertion (P = .04; ES = −0.49; 95% CI, −1.36 to 0.42), Lac, NEU, and LYM (P = .03; ES = −0.80; 95% CI, −1.67 to 0.14; ES = −0.16; 95% CI, −1.03 to 0.72; and ES = −0.94; 95% CI, −1.82 to 0.02, respectively) and more positive feelings (P = .02; ES = 0.81; 95% CI, −0.13 to 1.69) were observed after the RSA test performed on AT than on NG. No differences were observed in the remaining physical and blood markers. Conclusion: These findings suggest that RSA performance is enhanced on AT compared with NG. This effect was accompanied by lower fatigue perception and Lac, NEU, and LYM and a more pleasurable feeling. These observations might have implications for physical performance in intermittent team-sport athletes who train and compete on different playing surfaces.