Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 14 items for

  • Author: Karen P. DePauw x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Edited by Karen P. DePauw

Restricted access

Karen P. DePauw

Restricted access

Karen P. DePauw

Physical activity and sport are integral aspects of the human life-cycle of girls and women including girls and women with disabilities. Girls and women with disabilities actively seek physical activity and have become increasingly more visible and active participants in sport opportunities ranging from organized physical activity programs to recreational pursuits and elite sport competitions. To date, the researchers have focused on the influence of sport (and physical activity) upon girls and women with disabilities, thereby leaving the influence of girls and women with disabilities on sport as a social institution as a new frontier for critical feminist analysis.

Restricted access

Karen P. DePauw

For more than 20 years the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance has been able to provide services for professionals who serve individuals with disabilities. Not only have the nature and extent of those services varied over the years, but so have the entities providing the services. Although a merger of entities or structures serving programs of health, physical education, recreation, and dance for individuals with disabilities was previously discussed, it wasn’t until 1983 that the issue became a reality on the AAHPERD agenda. The article traces the recent history culminating in the merger of the Alliance programs and services on individuals with disabilities.

Restricted access

Karen P. DePauw

Although historical mention of horseback riding for individuals with disabilities can be traced through the centuries, programs of therapeutic riding were not established until the mid-1900s. Since its inception, horseback riding for the disabled has become diversified and increasingly sophisticated. As a result, the programs have a varying emphasis on riding as sport, recreation, education, or therapy. The literature contains articles describing therapeutic riding programs that include claims of medical and educational benefits for participants. Although the programs have existed for 30 years, interest in research on the benefits of horseback riding for the disabled is relatively new. Despite the progress made, it is critical that professionals in horseback riding for individuals with disabilities (a) collect empirical evidence supporting the claimed benefits, (b) develop appropriate evaluation instruments/tools, (c) identify effective intervention techniques, (d) provide for accessibility of publications/information from Europe, and (e) develop printed materials and audiovisuals for the health professional community.

Restricted access

Karen P. DePauw

Restricted access

Karen P. DePauw

This study was undertaken to investigate the total body and segmental centers of mass of individuals with Down’s syndrome. The 40 subjects were divided equally by gender into the following age groups: (a) ages 6 to 10, (b) ages 11 to 18, (c) adult females, and (d) adult males. Data on mass centroid locations were collected through a photogrammetric technique. Frontal and right sagittal-view slide photographs on each subject were digitized and the data logged into a computer program. The program calculated the segmental mass centroid locations and total body center of mass. Differences in total body and segmental center of mass locations were found between individuals with Down’s syndrome (DS) and nonhandicapped individuals. Analysis of the data on the DS children indicated that the mean center of mass location for the total body was within the range reported for nonhandicapped children. The adult DS male and female subjects were found to have a lower total body center of mass when compared to existing data on nonhandicapped adults. It was also found that the segmental mass centroid locations for the head and trunk segment of DS subjects were consistently lower than those found in nonhandicapped individuals. This finding points to an overall lowering of the center of mass found with DS subjects.