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Karianne Backx, Ken A. van Someren and Garry S. Palmer

This study investigated the effect of differing fluid volumes consumed during exercise, on cycle time-trial (TT) performance conducted under thermoneutral conditions (20 °C, 70% RH). Ten minutes after consuming a bolus of 6 ml · kg−1 body mass (BM) of a 6.4% CHO solution and immediately following a warm-up, 8 male cyclists undertook a 1-h self-paced TT on 4 separate occasions. During a “familiarization” trial, subjects were given three 5-min periods (15– 20 min, 30–35 min, and 45–50 min) to consume fluid ad libitum. Thereafter subjects undertook, in random order, trials consuming high (HF), moderate (MF), or low fluid (LF) volumes, where 300, 150, and 40 ml of fluid were consumed at 15, 30, and 45 min of each trial, respectively, and total CHO intake was maintained at 57.6 g. During exercise, power output and heart rate were monitored continuously, whilst stomach fullness was rated every 10 min. Additionally, BM loss and BM loss corrected for fluid intake was calculated during each trial. At 40, 50, and 60 min differences in ratings of stomach fullness were found between trials (LF vs. HF and MF vs. HF). There were however no differences in performance or physiological variables (heart rate or BM loss) between trials. These results indicate that when a pre-exercise CHO bolus is consumed, there is no effect of subsequent consumption of different fluid volumes when trained cyclists undertake a 1-h performance task in a thermoneutral environment.

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Jemma L. Hawkins, Alexander Smith, Karianne Backx and Deborah A. Clayton

Previous research has suggested that gardening activity could be an effective form of regular exercise for improving physical and psychological health in later life. However, there is a lack of data regarding the exercise intensities of various gardening tasks across different types of gardening and different populations. The purpose of this study was to examine the exercise intensity of gardening activity for older adult allotment gardeners in Wales, United Kingdom following a similar procedure used in previous studies conducted in the United States and South Korea by Park and colleagues (2008a; 2011). Oxygen consumption (VO2) and energy expenditure for six gardening tasks were measured via indirect calorimetery using the portable Oxycon mobile device. From these measures, estimated metabolic equivalent units (METs) were calculated. Consistent with Park et al. (2008a; 2011) the six gardening tasks were classified as low to moderate-high intensity physical activities based on their metabolic values (1.9–5.7 METs).