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Matthew Pearce, Tom R.P. Bishop, Stephen Sharp, Kate Westgate, Michelle Venables, Nicholas J. Wareham and Søren Brage

Harmonization of data for pooled analysis relies on the principle of inferential equivalence between variables from different sources. Ideally, this is achieved using models of the direct relationship with gold standard criterion measures, but the necessary validation study data are often unavailable. This study examines an alternative method of network harmonization using indirect models. Starting methods were self-report or accelerometry, from which we derived indirect models of relationships with doubly labelled water (DLW)-based physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) using sets of two bridge equations via one of three intermediate measures. Coefficients and performance of indirect models were compared to corresponding direct models (linear regression of DLW-based PAEE on starting methods). Indirect model beta coefficients were attenuated compared to direct model betas (10%–63%), narrowing the range of PAEE values; attenuation was greater when bridge equations were weak. Directly and indirectly harmonized models had similar error variance but most indirectly derived values were biased at group-level. Correlations with DLW-based PAEE were identical after harmonization using continuous linear but not categorical models. Wrist acceleration harmonized to DLW-based PAEE via combined accelerometry and heart rate sensing had the lowest error variance (24.5%) and non-significant mean bias 0.9 (95%CI: −1.6; 3.4) kJ·day−1·kg−1. Associations between PAEE and BMI were similar for directly and indirectly harmonized values, but most fell outside the confidence interval of the criterion PAEE-to-BMI association. Indirect models can be used for harmonization. Performance depends on the measurement properties of original data, variance explained by available bridge equations, and similarity of population characteristics.

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Eero A. Haapala, Juuso Väistö, Aapo Veijalainen, Niina Lintu, Petri Wiklund, Kate Westgate, Ulf Ekelund, Virpi Lindi, Soren Brage and Timo A. Lakka

Purpose:

To investigate the relationships of objectively measured physical activity (PA) and sedentary time (ST) to arterial stiffness in prepubertal children.

Method:

Altogether 136 children (57 boys, 79 girls) aged 6–8-years participated in the study. Stiffness index (SI) was assessed by pulse contour analysis based on photoplethysmography. ST, light PA, moderate PA, and vigorous PA were assessed using combined acceleration and heart rate monitoring. We investigated the associations of ST (<1.5METs) and time spent in intensity level of PA above 2–7METs in min/d with SI using linear regression analysis. We studied the optimal duration and intensity of PA to identify children being in the highest quarter of SI using Receiver Operating Characteristics curves.

Results:

Moderate PA, vigorous PA, and cumulative time spent in PA above 3 (β=–0.279, p = .002), 4 (β =–0.341, P<0.001), 5 (β =–0.349, P<0.001), 6 (β =–0.312, P<0.001), and 7 (β =–0.254, p = .005) METs were inversely associated with SI after adjustment for age, sex, and monitor wear time. The cutoffs for identifying children being in the highest quarter of SI <68 min/d for PA exceeding 5 METs and <26 min/d for PA exceeding 6 METs.

Conclusion:

Lower levels of PA exceeding 3–6 METs were related to higher arterial stiffness in children.