Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author: Kathleen Y. Wolin x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Kathleen Y. Wolin and Gary G. Bennett

Background:

The interrelations between various physical activity domains have received little empirical attention in the United States. Of particular interest, given the potential applicability to traditionally underserved communities, is the nature of the association between occupational physical activity (OPA) and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA).

Methods:

5448 adult men and women who participated in NHANES 1999–2000 were included in analyses. Linear regression was used to examine the bivariate and multivariable associations of OPA and education with LTPA. Generalized logit models were used to examine the association of education with OPA.

Results:

We found no association between education and LTPA. OPA was significantly positively associated with LTPA (P < .001). The association between OPA and LTPA was not strongest among those with low education and held only for men in gender-stratified analysis. Education was inversely associated with OPA (P < .001) in multivariable analysis.

Conclusions:

Our findings lend preliminary support to the hypothesis that OPA is an important determinant of LTPA, particularly in men. This provides additional support to calls for assessment of OPA, particularly among individuals of low social class.

Restricted access

I-Min Lee, Kathleen Y. Wolin, Sarah E. Freeman, Jacob Sattlemair and Howard D. Sesso

Background:

The number of cancer survivors is increasing rapidly; however, little is known about whether engaging in physical activity after a cancer diagnosis is associated with lower mortality rates in men.

Methods:

We conducted a prospective cohort study of 1021 men (mean age, 71.3 years) who were diagnosed with cancer (other than nonmelanoma skin cancer). Men reported their physical activities (walking, stair climbing, and participation in sports and recreational activities) on questionnaires in 1988, a median of 6 years after their cancer diagnosis. Physical activity was updated in 1993 and men were followed until 2008, with mortality follow-up > 99% complete, during which 777 men died (337 from cancer, 190 from cardiovascular disease).

Results:

In multivariate analyses, the relative risks for all-cause mortality associated with expending < 2100, 2100–4199, 4200–8399, 8400–12,599, and ≥ 12,600 kJ/week in physical activity were 1.00 (referent), 0.77, 0.74, 0.76, and 0.52, respectively (P-trend < 0.0001). Higher levels of physical activity also were associated with lower rates of death from cancer and cardiovascular disease (P-trend = 0.01 and 0.002, respectively).

Conclusions:

Engaging in physical activity after cancer diagnosis is associated with better survival among men.

Restricted access

Kathleen Y. Wolin, Daniel P. Heil, Sandy Askew, Charles E. Matthews and Gary G. Bennett

Background:

The International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form (IPAQ-S) has been evaluated against accelerometer-determined physical activity measures in small homogenous samples of adults in the United States. There is limited information about the validity of the IPAQ-S in diverse US samples.

Methods:

142 Blacks residing in low-income housing completed the IPAQ-S and wore an accelerometer for up to 6 days. Both 1- and 10-minute accelerometer bouts were used to define time spent in light, moderate, and vigorous physical activity.

Results:

We found fair agreement between the IPAQ-S and accelerometer-determined physical activity (r = .26 for 10-minute bout, r = .36 for 1-minute bout). Correlations were higher among men than women. When we classified participants as meeting physical activity recommendations, agreement was low (kappa = .04, 10-minute; kappa = .21, 1-minute); only 25% of individuals were classified the same by both instruments (10-minute bout).

Conclusions:

In one of the few studies to assess the validity of a self-reported physical activity measure among Blacks, we found moderate correlations with accelerometer data, though correlations were weaker for women. Correlations were smaller when IPAQ-S data were compared using a 10- versus a 1-minute bout definition. There was limited evidence for agreement between the instruments when classifying participants as meeting physical activity recommendations.