Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author: Kelly L. Simonton x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

K. Andrew R. Richards, Karen Lux Gaudreault, Kelly L. Simonton and Angela Simonton

Researchers have begun using occupational socialization theory to understand the experiences of physical education teacher education doctoral students and faculty members. Comparatively little work has been done with graduate students pursuing research-focused masters’ degrees. These programs can serve as pipelines into PhD programs and have implications for the process of becoming a faculty member. Using a qualitative methodology grounded in existential phenomenology, this 2-year longitudinal study sought to understand the perspectives of Angela and Kelly as they navigated the master’s degree program. Data were collected through interviews, an online discussion forum, and text message conversations. Data analysis resulted in the construction of three themes and associated subthemes to describe the data. The primary themes included: (a) adjusting to graduate student life, (b) the importance of relationships, and (c) preparing for life after graduate school. Results are discussed using occupational socialization theory, and implications for research and practice are suggested.

Restricted access

Kelly L. Simonton, Alex C. Garn and Melinda Ann Solmon

Purpose:

Grounded in control-value theory, a model of students’ achievement emotions in physical education (PE) was investigated.

Methods:

A path analysis tested hypotheses that students’ (N = 529) perceptions of teacher responsiveness, assertiveness, and clarity predict control and value beliefs which, in turn, predict enjoyment and boredom.

Results:

Teacher clarity predicted student control (β = .31; R 2= .09) and value (β = .21; R 2= .07) beliefs. Value and control beliefs positively predicted enjoyment (β = .71; β = .11; R 2 = .58) and negatively predicted boredom (β = -.61; β = -.13; R2 = .47).

Discussion:

Findings provide meaningful information about the source of students’ emotional experiences in PE. The importance of instructional clarity within the model highlights the need for teachers to use a variety of clarifying strategies during instruction. The strong links between value beliefs and emotions suggest teachers need to explicitly discuss the intrinsic and extrinsic worth of PE content.