Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author: Kelsey McEntyre x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Kelsey McEntyre, Matthew D. Curtner-Smith and Deborah S. Baxter

Purpose: To describe the patterns of negotiation engaged in by preservice classroom teachers (PCTs) and their students during a physical education early field experience. Method: The participants were 16 PCTs enrolled in the early field experience. They taught a variety of content within six lessons to second- and fourth-grade students. Data were collected using six qualitative methods and analyzed using analytic induction and constant comparison. Results/Conclusions: Seven PCTs were relatively effective negotiators, whereas nine PCTs were relatively ineffective. The PCTs’ negotiation skills were influenced by their comfort with physical education, pedagogical knowledge, content knowledge, and pedagogical content knowledge. The negotiations initiated by the PCTs and their students were similar to those described in previous studies. The type and amount of student-initiated negotiation was influenced by their gender, age, skill level, and content taught. The implications for preparing PCTs to teach physical education are discussed.

Restricted access

Kelsey McEntyre, Matthew D. Curtner-Smith and K. Andrew R. Richards

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the patterns of teacher–student negotiation that occurred when preservice teachers (PTs) taught within the teaching personal and social responsibility (TPSR) model. Method: The participants were seven PTs enrolled in an elementary early field experience. They taught three to four mini-units of TPSR. Seven qualitative techniques were employed to collect data, and standard interpretive techniques were used to analyze them. Results: Three general patterns of negotiation were identified. In the units taught by two of the PTs, the negotiations became more positive. For three of the PTs, the rates of negotiation were constant. In the units taught by the remaining two PTs, the negotiations became more negative. Key factors influencing the patterns of negotiation were PTs’ comprehension of and comfort with the TPSR model; class size; and students’ age, gender, and skill level. Conclusion: These findings may help faculty develop more nuanced and effective training for PTs learning to teach through TPSR.