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Ken A. van Someren and Glyn Howatson

Purpose:

To determine the relative importance of anthropometric and physiological attributes for performance in the 1000-m, 500-m, and 200-m flatwater kayaking events.

Methods:

Eighteen competitive male kayakers completed performance trials over the 3 distances and a battery of anthropometric and physiological tests.

Results:

Performance times (mean ± SD) for 1000 m, 500 m, and 200 m were 262.56 ± 36.44 s, 122.10 ± 5.74 s, and 41.59 ± 2.12 s, respectively. Performance in all 3 events was correlated with a number of physiological parameters; in addition, 500-m and 200-m performance was correlated with upper body dimensions. 1000-m time was predicted by power output at lactate turnpoint expressed as a percentage of maximal aerobic power, work done in a 30-s ergometry test and work done in a 2-min ergometry test (adjusted R 2 = 0.71, SEE = 5.72 s); 500-m time was predicted by work done and the fatigue index in a 30-s ergometry test, work done in a 2-min ergometry test, peak isometric and isokinetic function (adjusted R 2 = 0.79, SEE = 2.49 s); 200-m time was predicted by chest circumference, humeral breadth, peak power, work done, and the fatigue index in a 30-s ergometry test (adjusted R 2 = 0.71, SEE = 0.71 s).

Conclusions:

A number of physiological variables are correlated with performance in all events. 1000-m, 500-m, and 200-m times were predicted with a standard error of only 2.2%, 2.0%, and 1.7%, respectively.

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Karianne Backx, Ken A. van Someren and Garry S. Palmer

This study investigated the effect of differing fluid volumes consumed during exercise, on cycle time-trial (TT) performance conducted under thermoneutral conditions (20 °C, 70% RH). Ten minutes after consuming a bolus of 6 ml · kg−1 body mass (BM) of a 6.4% CHO solution and immediately following a warm-up, 8 male cyclists undertook a 1-h self-paced TT on 4 separate occasions. During a “familiarization” trial, subjects were given three 5-min periods (15– 20 min, 30–35 min, and 45–50 min) to consume fluid ad libitum. Thereafter subjects undertook, in random order, trials consuming high (HF), moderate (MF), or low fluid (LF) volumes, where 300, 150, and 40 ml of fluid were consumed at 15, 30, and 45 min of each trial, respectively, and total CHO intake was maintained at 57.6 g. During exercise, power output and heart rate were monitored continuously, whilst stomach fullness was rated every 10 min. Additionally, BM loss and BM loss corrected for fluid intake was calculated during each trial. At 40, 50, and 60 min differences in ratings of stomach fullness were found between trials (LF vs. HF and MF vs. HF). There were however no differences in performance or physiological variables (heart rate or BM loss) between trials. These results indicate that when a pre-exercise CHO bolus is consumed, there is no effect of subsequent consumption of different fluid volumes when trained cyclists undertake a 1-h performance task in a thermoneutral environment.

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Ken A. van Someren, Adam J. Edwards and Glyn Howatson

This study examined the effects of β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB) and α-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) supplementation on signs and symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage following a single bout of eccentrically biased resistance exercise. Six non-resistance trained male subjects performed an exercise protocol designed to induce muscle damage on two separate occasions, performed on the dominant or non-dominant arm in a counter-balanced crossover design. Subjects were assigned to an HMB/KIC (3 g HMB and 0.3 g α-ketoisocaproic acid, daily) or placebo treatment for 14 d prior to exercise in the counter-balanced crossover design. One repetition maximum (1RM), plasma creatine kinase activity (CK), delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), limb girth, and range of motion (ROM) were determined pre-exercise, at 1h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h post-exercise. DOMS and the percentage changes in 1RM, limb girth, and ROM all changed over the 72 h period (P < 0.05). HMB/KIC supplementation attenuated the CK response, the percentage decrement in 1RM, and the percentage increase in limb girth (P < 0.05). In addition, DOMS was reduced at 24 h post-exercise (P < 0.05) in the HMB/KIC treatment. In conclusion, 14 d of HMB and KIC supplementation reduced signs and symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage in non-resistance trained males following a single bout of eccentrically biased resistance exercise.

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Jonathan D.C. Leeder, Ken A. van Someren, David Gaze, Andrew Jewell, Nawed I.K. Deshmukh, Iltaf Shah, James Barker and Glyn Howatson

Purpose:

This investigation aimed to ascertain a detailed physiological profile of recovery from intermittentsprint exercise of athletes familiar with the exercise and to investigate if athletes receive a protective effect on markers of exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), inflammation, and oxidative stress after a repeated exposure to an identical bout of intermittent-sprint exercise.

Methods:

Eight well-trained male team-sport athletes of National League or English University Premier Division standard (mean ± SD age 23 ± 3 y, VO2max 54.8 ± 4.6 mL · kg−1 · min−1) completed the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (LIST) on 2 occasions, separated by 14 d. Maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MIVC), countermovement jump (CMJ), creatine kinase (CK), C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), F2-isoprostanes, and muscle soreness (DOMS) were measured before and up to 72 h after the initial and repeated LISTs.

Results:

MIVC, CMJ, CK, IL-6, and DOMS all showed main effects for time (P < .05) after the LIST, indicating that EIMD was present. DOMS peaked at 24 h after LIST 1 (110 ± 53 mm), was attenuated after LIST 2 (56 ± 39 mm), and was the only dependent variable to demonstrate a reduction in the second bout (P = .008). All other markers indicated that EIMD did not differ between bouts.

Conclusion:

Well-trained games players experienced EIMD after exposure to both exercise tests, despite being accustomed to the exercise type. This suggests that well-trained athletes receive a very limited protective effect from the first bout.