Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author: Kenneth J. Ottenbacher x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Zakkoyya H. Lewis, Kyriakos S. Markides, Kenneth J. Ottenbacher and Soham Al Snih

Background: We investigated the association between 10 years of change in physical activity (PA) levels and 7-year all-cause mortality. Methods: Mexican American adults aged 67 and older (N = 803) participating in the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly (1995/1996–2012/2013) were included. All-cause mortality was our outcome. Participants were divided into 4 groups based on their difference in overall PA between 1995/1996 and 2005/2006 measured by the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly. Participants were classified as having unchanged low PA (n = 339), decreased activity (n = 233), unchanged high activity (n = 166), and increased activity (n = 65). Change in the frequency of PA domains was also investigated. PA domains included leisure, household, sedentary, and walking activities. Results:After controlling for all covariates, results from the Cox proportional hazards regression found a 43% lower mortality risk in the increased PA group (hazards ratio = 0.57; 95% confidence interval, 0.34–0.97) compared with the unchanged low PA group. In the entire sample, a significantly lower mortality risk was also present among walking (hazards ratio = 0.88) and household (hazards ratio = 0.88) activities. Conclusion:Our results suggest that, independent of other factors, increasing PA is most protective of mortality among older Mexican Americans.

Restricted access

Zakkoyya H. Lewis, Kyriakos S. Markides, Kenneth J. Ottenbacher and Soham Al Snih

We investigated the relationship between physical activity and physical function on the risk of falls over time in a cohort of Mexican-American adults aged 75 and older from the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly (H-EPESE). Participants were divided into four groups according to their level of physical activity and physical function: low physical activity and low physical function (n = 453); low physical activity and high physical function (n = 54); high physical activity and low physical function (n = 307); and high physical activity and high physical function (n = 197). Using generalized linear equation estimation, we showed that participants with high physical activity and low physical function had a greater fall risk over time, followed by the high physical activity and high physical function group. Participants seldom took part in activities that improve physical function. To prevent falls, modifications to physical activity should be made for older Mexican Americans.