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Daniel H. Serravite, Arlette Perry, Kevin A. Jacobs, Jose A. Adams, Kysha Harriell and Joseph F. Signorile

Purpose:

To examine the effects of whole-body periodic acceleration (pGz) on exercise-induced-muscle-damage (EIMD) -related symptoms induced by unaccustomed eccentric arm exercise.

Methods:

Seventeen active young men (23.4 ± 4.6 y) made 6 visits to the research facility over a 2-wk period. On day 1, subjects performed a 1-repetition-maximum (1RM) elbowflexion test and were randomly assigned to the pGz (n = 8) or control group (n = 9). Criterion measurements were taken on day 2, before and immediately after performance of the eccentric-exercise protocol (10 sets, 10 repetitions using 120% 1RM) and after the recovery period. During subsequent sessions (24, 48, 72, and 96 h) these data were collected before pGz or passive recovery. Measurements included isometric strength (maximal voluntary contraction [MVC]), blood markers (creatine kinase, myoglobin, IL-6, TNF-α, TBARS, PGF2α, protein carbonyls, uric acid, and nitrites), soreness, pain, circumference, and range of motion (ROM).

Results:

Significantly higher MVC values were seen for pGz throughout the recovery period. Within-group differences were seen in myoglobin, IL-6, IL-10, protein carbonyls, soreness, pain, circumference, and ROM showing small negative responses and rapid recovery for the pGz condition.

Conclusion:

Our results demonstrate that pGz can be an effective tool for the reduction of EIMD and may contribute to the training-adaptation cycle by speeding up the recovery of the body due to its performance-loss-lessening effect.

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David Paul, Kevin A. Jacobs, Raymond J. Geor and Kenneth W. Hinchcliff

To determine the effect of macronutrient composition of pre-exercise meals on exercise metabolism and performance, 8 trained men exercised for 30 min above lactate threshold (30LT), followed by a 20-km time trial (TT). Approximately 3.5 h before exercise, subjects consumed a carbohydrate meal (C; 3 g carbohydrate/kg), an isoenergetic fat meal (F; 1.3 g fat/kg), or a placebo meal (P; no energy content) on 3 separate occasions in randomized order. Treatments had no effect on carbohydrate oxidation during exercise, but C decreased whole-body fat oxidation during the last 5 min of 30LT and TT, respectively (3.2 ± 1.6 and 4.8 ± 2.1 mmol · kg−1 · min−1, p < .05) when compared to F (13.3 ± 1.6 and 16.5 ± 2.7 mmol · kg−1 · min−1) and P (15.9 ± 2.7 and 17.0 ± 3.2 mmol · kg−1 · min−1). Glucose rate of appearance (Ra) and disappearance (Rd), and muscle glycogen utilization were not significantly different among treatments during exercise. TT performances were similar for C, F, and P (32.7 ± 0.5 vs. 33.1 ± 1.1 and 33.0 ± 0.8 min, p > .05). We conclude that the consumption of a pre-exercise meal has minor effects on fat oxidation during high-intensity exercise, and no effect on carbohydrate oxidation or TT performance.

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Kevin A. Jacobs, David R. Paul, Ray J. Geor, Kenneth W. Hinchcliff and W. Michael Sherman

The purpose of the current study was to examine the influence of dietary composition on short-term endurance training–induced adaptations of substrate partitioning and time trial exercise performance. Eight untrained males cycled for 90 min at ~54% aerobic capacity while being infused with [6,62H]glucose before and after two 10-d experimental phases separated by a 2-week washout period. Time trial performance was measured after the 90-min exercise trials before and after the 2nd experimental phase. During the first 10-d phase, subjects were randomly assigned to consume either a high carbohydrate or high fat diet while remaining inactive (CHO or FAT). During the second 10-d phase, subjects consumed the opposite diet, and both groups performed identical daily supervised endurance training (CHO+T or FAT+T). CHO and CHO+T did not affect exercise metabolism. FAT reduced glucose flux at the end of exercise, while FAT+T substantially increased whole body lipid oxidation during exercise and reduced glucose flux at the end of exercise. Despite these differences in adaptation of substrate use, training resulted in similar improvements in time trial performance for both groups. We conclude that (a) 10-d high fat diets result in substantial increases in whole body lipid oxidation during exercise when combined with daily aerobic training, and (b) diet does not affect short-term training-induced improvements in high-intensity time trial performance.