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Kevin L. Burke

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Gregory Shaw, Kevin T. Boyd, Louise M. Burke and Anu Koivisto

Swimming is a sport that requires considerable training commitment to reach individual performance goals. Nutrition requirements are specific to the macrocycle, microcycle, and individual session. Swimmers should ensure suitable energy availability to support training while maintaining long term health. Carbohydrate intake, both over the day and in relation to a workout, should be manipulated (3–10g/kg of body mass/day) according to the fuel demands of training and the varying importance of undertaking these sessions with high carbohydrate availability. Swimmers should aim to consume 0.3g of high-biological-value protein per kilogram of body mass immediately after key sessions and at regular intervals throughout the day to promote tissue adaptation. A mixed diet consisting of a variety of nutrient-dense food choices should be sufficient to meet the micronutrient requirements of most swimmers. Specific dietary supplements may prove beneficial to swimmers in unique situations, but should be tried only with the support of trained professionals. All swimmers, particularly adolescent and youth swimmers, are encouraged to focus on a well-planned diet to maximize training performance, which ensures sufficient energy availability especially during periods of growth and development. Swimmers are encouraged to avoid rapid weight fluctuations; rather, optimal body composition should be achieved over longer periods by modest dietary modifications that improve their food choices. During periods of reduced energy expenditure (taper, injury, off season) swimmers are encouraged to match energy intake to requirement. Swimmers undertaking demanding competition programs should ensure suitable recovery practices are used to maintain adequate glycogen stores over the entirety of the competition period.

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Robert S. Weinberg, Kevin L. Burke and Allen Jackson

This study examined the various aspects of goal setting of youth tennis players and their coaches. To examine this multifaceted technique, an extensive goal-setting questionnaire was administered to 224 youth tennis players and 35 youth tennis coaches. Results indicated that improving overall performance, fun/enjoyment, and winning were the three most important goals for youth tennis players and that they most preferred setting moderately difficult goals. The most effective type of goals for players were physical conditioning, practice, and skill/technique, whereas the top reasons for setting goals were focusing attention, problem-solving, and increasing effort. Results also revealed numerous significant differences between coaches’ and players’ goal setting, with the coaches generally having a higher frequency of using different goal-setting strategies and finding them more effective. Results were discussed in terms of developmental differences between youth and college athletes, as well as individual difference variables such as gender and ability.

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Robert Brustad, Kevin Burke, Howard Hall, Vikki Krane and Jim Taylor

Edited by Charles Hardy

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Steve Boutcher, Robert Brestrad, Kevin Burke, Howard Hall, Jim Taylor and Mark Thompson

Edited by Charles J. Hardy

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Kevin L. Burke, Vikki Krane, Jim Taylor, Mark A. Thompson and James P. Whelan

Edited by J. Robert Grove

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Kevin Burke, Thomas E. Deeter, Robert I. Brustad, Robert Grave, Linda Petlichkoff and Diane M. Weise

Edited by Charles J. Hardy

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Vicki Ebbeck, Jim Taylor, Mark A. Thompson, Kevin L. Burke, Vikki Krane and Howard K. Hall

Edited by Charles J. Hardy

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Stephen Boutcher, Robert J. Brastad, Kevin Burke, Thomas E. Deeter, David Dzewaltowski, Robert Grove, Linda Petlichkoff and Diane M. Wiese

Edited by Charles J. Hardy