Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 23 items for

  • Author: Kevin Till x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Relationships Between Training Load, Sleep Duration, and Daily Well-Being and Recovery Measures in Youth Athletes

Thomas Sawczuk, Ben Jones, Sean Scantlebury, and Kevin Till

Purpose: To assess the relationships between training load, sleep duration, and 3 daily well-being, recovery, and fatigue measures in youth athletes. Methods: Fifty-two youth athletes completed 3 maximal countermovement jumps (CMJs), a daily well-being questionnaire (DWB), the perceived recovery status scale (PRS), and provided details on their previous day’s training loads (training) and self-reported sleep duration (sleep) on 4 weekdays over a 7-week period. Partial correlations, linear mixed models, and magnitude-based inferences were used to assess the relationships between the predictor variables (training and sleep) and the dependent variables (CMJ, DWB, and PRS). Results: There was no relationship between CMJ and training (r = −.09; ±.06) or sleep (r = .01; ±.06). The DWB was correlated with sleep (r = .28; ±.05, small), but not training (r = −.05; ±.06). The PRS was correlated with training (r = −.23; ±.05, small), but not sleep (r = .12; ±.06). The DWB was sensitive to low sleep (d = −0.33; ±0.11) relative to moderate; PRS was sensitive to high (d = −0.36; ±0.11) and low (d = 0.29; ±0.17) training relative to moderate. Conclusions: The PRS is a simple tool to monitor the training response, but DWB may provide a greater understanding of the athlete’s overall well-being. The CMJ was not associated with the training or sleep response in this population.

Restricted access

Players’ Perceptions of the Talent Development Environment Within the English Premier League and Football League

Tom O. Mitchell, Adam Gledhill, Ross Shand, Martin A. Littlewood, Lewis Charnock, and Kevin Till

There is an increasing awareness of the importance of the environment in academy players’ development, yet limited research has investigated players’ perceptions of their talent development environments (TDEs). This study focused on academy soccer players’ perceptions of their TDE and compared perceptions across the English soccer academy categorization (CAT) system. A total of 136 U.K.-based male soccer players (M age = 17.7, SD = 1.03 years) representing all four categories (1 = highest to 4 = lowest) of soccer academies aligned to professional soccer clubs completed the TDE Questionnaire-5 (TDEQ-5). The players within the CAT1 academies had significantly more positive perceptions of their support network (p = .01) and holistic quality preparation (p = .03) than their CAT3 counterparts. Across CAT2–CAT3, holistic quality preparation was the least positively perceived subscale within the TDEQ-5, suggesting the need for additional coach education in this area. Soccer academies should consider how they ensure that all areas of their service are associated with optimal TDEs by offering a well-communicated and holistic development experience for their players to enhance effective personal and player development. The findings may have implications for player experience and associated progression rates of lower categorized soccer academies.

Restricted access

Using Principal Component Analysis to Compare the Physical Qualities Between Academy and International Youth Rugby League Players

Sam McCormack, Ben Jones, Sean Scantlebury, Neil Collins, Cameron Owen, and Kevin Till

Purpose: To compare the physical qualities between academy and international youth rugby league (RL) players using principal component analysis. Methods: Six hundred fifty-four males (age = 16.7 [1.4] y; height = 178.4 [13.3] cm; body mass = 82.2 [14.5] kg) from 11 English RL academies participated in this study. Participants completed anthropometric, power (countermovement jump), strength (isometric midthigh pull; IMTP), speed (10 and 40 m speed), and aerobic endurance (prone Yo-Yo IR1) assessments. Principal component analysis was conducted on all physical quality measures. A 1-way analysis of variance with effect sizes was performed on 2 principal components (PCs) to identify differences between academy and international backs, forwards, and pivots at under 16 and 18 age groups. Results : Physical quality measures were reduced to 2 PCs explaining 69.4% of variance. The first PC (35.3%) was influenced by maximum and 10-m momentum, absolute IMTP, and body mass. Ten and forty-meter speed, body mass and fat, prone Yo-Yo, IMTP relative, maximum speed, and countermovement jump contributed to PC2 (34.1%). Significant differences (P < .05, effect size = −1.83) were identified between U18 academy and international backs within PC1. Conclusion: Running momentum, absolute IMTP, and body mass contributed to PC1, while numerous qualities influenced PC2. The physical qualities of academy and international youth RL players are similar, excluding U18 backs. Principal component analysis can reduce the dimensionality of a data set and help identify overall differences between playing levels. Findings suggest that RL practitioners should measure multiple physical qualities when assessing physical performance.

Restricted access

Prediction of Upper Respiratory Illness Using Salivary Immunoglobulin A in Youth Athletes

Thomas Sawczuk, Ben Jones, Mitchell Welch, Clive Beggs, Sean Scantlebury, and Kevin Till

Purpose: To evaluate the relative importance and predictive ability of salivary immunoglobulin A (s-IgA) measures with regards to upper respiratory illness (URI) in youth athletes. Methods: Over a 38-week period, 22 youth athletes (age = 16.8 [0.5] y) provided daily symptoms of URI and 15 fortnightly passive drool saliva samples, from which s-IgA concentration and secretion rate were measured. Kernel-smoothed bootstrapping generated a balanced data set with simulated data points. The random forest algorithm was used to evaluate the relative importance (RI) and predictive ability of s-IgA concentration and secretion rate with regards to URI symptoms present on the day of saliva sampling (URIday), within 2 weeks of sampling (URI2wk), and within 4 weeks of sampling (URI4wk). Results: The percentage deviation from average healthy s-IgA concentration was the most important feature for URIday (median RI 1.74, interquartile range 1.41–2.07). The average healthy s-IgA secretion rate was the most important feature for URI4wk (median RI 0.94, interquartile range 0.79–1.13). No feature was clearly more important than any other when URI symptoms were identified within 2 weeks of sampling. The values for median area under the curve were 0.68, 0.63, and 0.65 for URIday, URI2wk, and URI4wk, respectively. Conclusions: The RI values suggest that the percentage deviation from average healthy s-IgA concentration may be used to evaluate the short-term risk of URI, while the average healthy s-IgA secretion rate may be used to evaluate the long-term risk. However, the results show that neither s-IgA concentration nor secretion rate can be used to accurately predict URI onset within a 4-week window in youth athletes.

Restricted access

To Jump or Cycle? Monitoring Neuromuscular Function in Rugby Union Players

Gregory Roe, Joshua Darrall-Jones, Kevin Till, Padraic Phibbs, Dale Read, Jonathon Weakley, and Ben Jones

Purpose:

To evaluate changes in performance of a 6-s cycle-ergometer test (CET) and countermovement jump (CMJ) during a 6-wk training block in professional rugby union players.

Methods:

Twelve young professional rugby union players performed 2 CETs and CMJs on the 1st and 4th mornings of every week before the commencement of daily training during a 6-wk training block. Standardized changes in the highest score of 2 CET and CMJ efforts were assessed using linear mixed modeling and magnitude-based inferences.

Results:

After increases in training load during wk 3 to 5, moderate decreases in CMJ peak and mean power and small decreases in flight time were observed during wk 5 and 6 that were very likely to almost certainly greater than the smallest worthwhile change (SWC), suggesting neuromuscular fatigue. However, only small decreases, possibly greater than the SWC, were observed in CET peak power. Changes in CMJ peak and mean power were moderately greater than in CET peak power during this period, while the difference between flight time and CET peak power was small.

Conclusion:

The greater weekly changes in CMJ metrics in comparison with CET may indicate differences in the capacities of these tests to measure training-induced lower-body neuromuscular fatigue in rugby union players. However, future research is needed to ascertain the specific modes of training that elicit changes in CMJ and CET to determine the efficacy of each test for monitoring neuromuscular function in rugby union players.

Restricted access

Validity of 10-HZ GPS and Timing Gates for Assessing Maximum Velocity in Professional Rugby Union Players

Gregory Roe, Joshua Darrall-Jones, Christopher Black, William Shaw, Kevin Till, and Ben Jones

Purpose:

The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity of timing gates and 10-Hz global positioning systems (GPS) units (Catapult Optimeye S5) against a criterion measure (50-Hz radar gun) for assessing maximum sprint velocity (Vmax).

Methods:

Nine male professional rugby union players performed 3 maximal 40-m sprints with 3 min rest between efforts with Vmax assessed simultaneously via timing gates, 10-Hz GPSOpen (Openfield software), GPSSprint (Sprint software), and radar gun. Eight players wore 3 GPS units, while 1 wore a single unit during each sprint.

Results:

When compared with the radar gun, mean biases for GPSOpen, GPSSprint, and timing gates were trivial, small, and small, respectively. The typical error of the estimate (TEE) was small for timing gate and GPSOpen while moderate for GPSSprint. Correlations with radar gun were nearly perfect for all measures. Mean bias, TEE, and correlations between GPS units were trivial, small, and nearly perfect, respectively, while a small TEE existed when GPSOpenfield was compared with GPSSprint.

Conclusion:

Based on these findings, both 10-Hz GPS and timing gates provide valid measures of 40-m Vmax assessment compared with a radar gun. However, as error did exist between measures, the same testing protocol should be used when assessing 40-m Vmax over time. Furthermore, in light of the above results, it is recommended that when assessing changes in GPS-derived Vmax over time, practitioners should use the same unit for each player and perform the analysis with the same software, preferably Catapult Openfield.

Restricted access

International Sport Coaching Journal Digest Volume 4, Issue #3

A.J. Rankin-Wright, Jason Tee, Tom Mitchell, Ian Cowburn, Kevin Till, and Sergio Lara-Bercial

Restricted access

International Sport Coaching Journal Digest Volume 2, Issue #2

Lea Dohme, Emma Boocock, Andrew Abraham, Dave Piggott, Kevin Till, and Sergio Lara-Bercial

Restricted access

International Sport Coaching Journal Digest Volume 2, Issue #3

Sergio Lara-Bercial, Lea Dohme, Emma Boocock, Andrew Abraham, Dave Piggott, and Kevin Till

Restricted access

International Sport Coaching Journal Digest Volume 3, Issue #1

Emma Boocock, Sergio Lara-Bercial, Lea Dohme, Andrew Abraham, Dave Piggott, and Kevin Till