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Koon Teck Koh, Wenxiang Foo, Goken Sakamoto and Adrian Low

The demand for certified sports coaches in Singapore is high, especially from the schools and private sectors. This trend is in line with the significant global growth of the vocation of sports coaching (Taylor & Garratt, 2013). The purpose of this paper is to provide an informal review of the state of coaching and coach education in Singapore, by addressing three main themes: (1) provide an overview of the evolution of the Singaporean coaching system since the late 1990s, (2) describe examples of identified ground up initiatives from various stakeholders within the coaching ecosystem and (3) draw conclusions from existing literature and provide suggestions on how coach education systems can be further developed. The foundation of the current coaching system was established in the late 1990s with the introduction of the National Coaching Accreditation Program (NCAP) and it is still the benchmark for the coaching practice in Singapore today. The basic NCAP is broken down to a theory and technical component which is administered by the Singapore Sports Council (SSC) and the National Sports Associations (NSAs) respectively. The SSC had embarked on various initiatives over the years to ensure that more Singaporeans have access to quality coaching.

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Si Hui Regina Lim, Koon Teck Koh and Melvin Chan

Competing demands in coaching duties hinder coaches from effecting Positive Youth Development (PYD) among athletes. While research has documented how supporting staff in youth sport teams can help coaches facilitate PYD, such studies have been scarce and brief in discussing how they impact PYD among high school athletes. The present study examined the roles supporting staff can play and their contributions to PYD in high school sports. Eight high school sport teams (48 athletes, 8 coaches, 8 teachers) were recruited through purposive sampling. Coaches, athletes and supporting staff from each team were interviewed for a comprehensive account of the research interest. Thematic analysis of the interview transcripts yielded the main themes of: 1) roles played by supporting staff in youth sport teams, 2) their contributions to PYD, and 3) advantages over sport coaches in promoting PYD. Results suggest that supporting staff complement coaches in promoting PYD and may be in more advantageous positions to impact some areas of PYD in high school sports. We additionally highlighted important benefits of having school educators support youth sport teams. Considering the study’s limitations, this paper discussed implications of the findings and provided recommendations for coach education and practice in high school sports.

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Koon Teck Koh, Clifford J. Mallett, Martin Camiré and Chee Keng John Wang

The purpose of this study was to conduct a guided reflection intervention for high performance basketball coaches. The study participants included two head basketball coaches and 10 of their players who were part of elite youth teams in Singapore. The coaches were highly experienced, each with 17 and 20 years of coaching experience respectively, and the players from both teams (one male and one female) reported on average three years of playing experience at the national youth level. The Singapore coaching behavior scale for sport (CBS-S basketball), on-site observations, and interviews were used to gather data from the coaches and players. Coaches also kept a reflective journal throughout the intervention. The results showed how the coaches responded differently to the guided reflection intervention (implemented by the first author) in terms of their willingness to adapt and integrate new perspectives into their coaching practice. The coaches’ level of reflection was found to be contingent upon a) their motivation and desire to be engaged in the process and b) the worth they saw in the learning facilitator’s recommendations to improve their athletes’ technical and tactical development. The results also showed how the coaches’ behaviors were linked to players’ satisfaction level with their work. The results are discussed using the coaching science literature and practical implications are proposed to optimize coaches’ use of reflection as a learning tool to improve their coaching practice.

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Andrew Bennie, Nicholas Apoifis, Jeffrey Caron, William Falcão, Demelza Marlin, Enrique García Bengoechea, Koon Teck Koh, Freya Macmillan and Emma George

Research in coaching science continues to grow and as such, there is a need for rigorous tools to help make sense of the rapidly expanding literature. The purpose of this paper is to provide a detailed description of a systematic review methodology that can be used to summarise literature in coaching science. To do so, we present a test case of a systematic review we conducted on the sport coaching experiences of global Indigenous populations. More precisely, we conducted a systematic review of English, Spanish, French, Mandarin, and Portuguese peer-reviewed journal articles, spanning twelve databases (e.g., Sport Discus, ERIC, and Scopus) from 1970 to 2014. ENTREQ and COREQ guidelines were followed to report the results of the systematic review, and Bronfenbrenner’s ecological systems theory was used as a theoretical framework to extract and synthesise relevant findings from the included articles. In sum, this paper presents a robust methodology for systematically reviewing research in coaching science and provides practical insights for those who endeavour to conduct rigorous literature searches in this domain.