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  • Author: Kurt E. Beschorner x
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Seth T. Strayer, Seyed Reza M. Moghaddam, Beth Gusenoff, Jeffrey Gusenoff and Kurt E. Beschorner

Pressure offloading is critical to diabetic foot ulcer healing and prevention. A novel product has been proposed to achieve this offloading with an insole that can be easily modified for each user. This insole consists of pressurized bubbles that can be selectively perforated and depressurized to redistribute weight to the nonulcer region of the foot. However, the effect of the insole design parameters, for example, bubble height and stiffness, on offloading effectiveness is unknown. To this end, a 3-dimensional finite element model was developed to simulate contact between the rearfoot and insole. The geometry of the calcaneus bone and soft tissue was based on the medical images of an average male patient, and material properties and loading conditions based on the values reported in the literature were used. The model predicts that increasing bubble height and stiffness leads to a more effectively offloaded region. However, the model also predicts that increasing stiffness leads to increasing contact pressures on the surrounding soft tissue. Thus, a combination of insole design parameters was determined, which completely offloads the desired region, while simultaneously reducing the contact pressure on the surrounding soft tissue. This design is expected to aid in diabetic foot ulcer healing and prevention.

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Erika M. Pliner, April A. Dukes, Kurt E. Beschorner and Arash Mahboobin

There is a need for pedagogical techniques that increase student engagement among underrepresented groups in engineering. Relating engineering content to student interests, particularly through biomechanics applications, shows promise toward engaging a diverse group of students. This study investigates the effects of student interests on engagement and performance in 10th grade students enrolled in a summer program for students underrepresented in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields. The authors assessed the effects of interest-tailored lectures on student engagement and performance in a 5-week program with bioengineering workshops, focusing on the delivery of biomechanics content. A total of 31 students received interest-tailored lectures (intervention) and 23 students received only generic lectures (control) in biomechanics. In addition, the authors assessed the effects of teaching method (lecture, classroom activities, and laboratory tours) on student engagement. The authors found interest-tailored lectures to significantly increase student engagement in lecture compared with generic lectures. Students that received interest-tailored lectures had an insignificant, but meaningful 5% increase in student performance. Students rated laboratory tours higher in engagement than other teaching methods. This study provides detailed examples that can directly assist student teaching and outreach in biomechanics. Furthermore, the pedagogical techniques in this study can be used to increase engagement of underrepresented students in engineering.