Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author: Kurusart Konharn x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Kurusart Konharn, Maria Paula Santos and José Carlos Ribeiro

Background:

The impact of socioeconomic status (SES) on objective measures of physical activity (PA) in adolescence is poorly understood. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the association between SES and objectively measured PA in Thai adolescents.

Methods:

PA was objectively measured every 30 seconds for 7 consecutive days using ActiGraph GT1M uniaxial accelerometers in 177 secondary-school adolescents aged 13 to 18 years that were classified into 3 SES groups (low, middle, and high). The associations between SES and adolescents’ PA were examined using 1-way ANOVA with multiple comparisons and Chi-square test.

Results:

Adolescents of low-SES accumulated more minutes of PA and less of sedentary behavior than those of high-SES, Additionally, low-SES adolescents tended to meet the daily PA guidelines more than other groups, particularly in girls (P < .01).

Conclusions:

This study evidences an inverse relationship between SES and PA levels, and shows the importance of targeting high SES adolescents in intervention programs to enhance health behaviors. Based on these findings, we also suggest that SES must be considered as an important determinant in promoting regular PA and in increasing proportions of adolescents meeting current health-related PA guidelines.

Restricted access

Kurusart Konharn, Wichai Eungpinichpong, Kluaymai Promdee, Paramaporn Sangpara, Settapong Nongharnpitak, Waradanai Malila and Jirachai Karawa

Background:

The suitability of smartphone applications (apps) currently used to track walking/running may differ depending on a person’s weight condition. This study aimed to examine the validity and reliability of apps for both normal-weight and overweight/obese young adults.

Methods:

Thirty normal-weight (aged 21.7 ± 1.0 years, BMI 21.3 ± 1.9 kg/m2) and 30 overweight/ obese young adults (aged 21.0 ± 1.4 years, BMI 28.6 ± 3.7 kg/m2) wore a smartphone and pedometer on their right hip while walking/running at 3 different intensities on treadmills. Apps was randomly assigned to each individual for measuring average velocity, step count, distance, and energy expenditure (EE), and these measurements were then analyzed.

Results:

The apps were not accurate in counting most of the measured variables and data fell significantly lower in the parameters than those measured with standard-reference instruments in both light and moderate intensity activity among the normal-weight group. Among the overweight and obese group, the apps were not accurate in detecting velocity, distance, or EE during either light or vigorous intensities. The percentages of mean difference were 30.1% to 48.9%.

Conclusion:

Apps may not have sufficient accuracy to monitor important physical parameters of human body movement. Apps need to be developed that can, in particular, respond differently based on a person’s weight status.

Open access

Areekul Amornsriwatanakul, Kasem Nakornkhet, Piyawat Katewongsa, Chairat Choosakul, Tippawan Kaewmanee, Kurusart Konharn, Atchara Purakom, Anoma Santiworakul, Patraporn Sitilertpisan, Sonthaya Sriramatr, Araya Yankai, Michael Rosenberg and Fiona C. Bull

Background:

Physical activity (PA) is recognized as one of the core modifiable risk factors of noncommunicable diseases. However, little is known about PA in the Thai population, particularly in children. The report card (RC) project provided Thailand with an opportunity to assess PA behaviors in children. This paper summarizes the methodology, grading process, and the final grades of the Thai RC.

Methods:

A school-based survey was conducted to collect data from a nationally representative sample of children aged 6 to 17 years. Survey results provided the primary source for the RC. Nine indicators were graded using the Global Matrix 2.0 framework. Grading was undertaken by a national committee comprising experts from key stakeholders.

Results:

Grades ranged from F to B. Overall PA and Sedentary Behaviors both received the grade D-. Organized Sport Participation scored a C. Active Play scored the grade F. Active Transport and support from Family and Peers were both graded B. School, Community, and Government indicators were scored C.

Conclusions:

In Thai children, participation in PA and active play is very low; conversely, sedentary behaviors are high. These first data on patterns of activity for the Thailand RC will serve to guide national actions and advocacy aimed at increasing PA in children.