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Scott Tainsky, Brian M. Mills, Zainab Hans and Kyunghee Lee

Investigation of minor league demand is scant relative to major leagues, particularly at the game level. This presents not only a contextual gap in the research, but also a conceptual one related to demand externalities. Minor League Baseball differs from major professional leagues in that gate revenue sharing is not a fixture in league policy, and talent investment decisions are made by the parent club. Nonetheless, it may be the case that a host club benefits from characteristics of its opponent. Econometric examination of over 31,000 minor league games across multiple leagues and seasons finds proximity to an opponent’s major league parent team increases attendance. Although the authors find evidence of increased demand for a top prospect from the home club, the presence of visiting top prospects is not associated with changes in attendance, prompting the question as to whether effective marketing efforts in this regard would increase home club revenues.

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Min-Hyeok Kang, Dong-Kyu Lee, Kyung-Hee Park and Jae-Seop Oh

Context:

Ankle-dorsiflexion range of motion has often been measured in the weight-bearing condition in the clinical setting; however, little is known about the relationship between the weight-bearing-lunge test (WBLT) and both ankle kinematics and performance on dynamic postural-control tests.

Objective:

To examine whether ankle kinematics and performance on the Lower Quarter Y-Balance Test (YBT-LQ) are correlated with results of the WBLT using an inclinometer and tape measure.

Design:

Cross-sectional.

Setting:

University motionanalysis laboratory.

Participants:

30 physically active participants.

Interventions:

None.

Main Outcome Measures:

The WBLT was evaluated using an inclinometer and a tape measure. The reach distances in the anterior, posteromedial, and posterolateral directions on the YBT-LQ were normalized by limb length. Ankle dorsiflexion during the YBT-LQ was recorded using a 3-dimensional motion-analysis system. Simple linear regression was used to examine the relationship between the WBLT results and both ankle dorsiflexion and the normalized reach distance in each direction on the YBT-LQ.

Results:

The WBLT results were significantly correlated with ankle dorsiflexion in all directions on the YBT-LQ (P < .05). A strong correlation was found between the inclinometer measurement of the WBLT and ankle dorsiflexion (r = .74, r 2 = .55), whereas the tape-measure results on the WBLT were moderately correlated with ankle dorsiflexion (r = .64, r 2 = .40) during the anterior reach on the YBT-LQ. Only the normalized anterior reach distance was significantly correlated with the results for the inclinometer (r = .68, r 2 = .46) and the tape measure (r = .64, r 2 = .41) on the WBLT.

Conclusions:

Inclinometer measurements on the WBLT can be an appropriate tool for predicting the amount of ankle dorsiflexion during the YBT-LQ. Furthermore, WBLT should be measured in those who demonstrate poor dynamic balance.