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  • Author: Latetia V. Moore x
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Latetia V. Moore, Janet Fulton, Judy Kruger and Judith McDivitt

Background:

We estimated percentages of US adults (≥18 years) who knew that prior federal physical activity (PA) guidelines call for a minimum of 30 minutes of moderate-intensity PA most days(≥5)/week using 2003 to 2005 HealthStyles, an annual mail survey.

Methods:

10,117 participants identified “the minimum amount of moderate-intensity PA the government recommends to get overall health benefits.” Response options included 30/≥5, 20/≥3, 30/7, and 60/7 (minutes/days per week), “none of these,” and “don’t know.” The odds of correctly identifying the guideline was modeled by participant sex, age, race/ethnicity, income, education, marital status, body mass index, physical activity level, and survey year using logistic regression.

Results:

25.6% of respondents correctly identified the guideline. Women were 30% more likely to identify the guideline than men (Odds Ratio [95% Confidence Limits] (OR) = 1.28 [1.15, 1.44]). Regular PA was positively associated with identifying the guideline versus inactivity (OR = 2.08 [1.73, 2.50]). Blacks and those earning <$15,000 annually were 24% to 32% less likely to identify the guideline than whites and those earning >$60,000, respectively.

Conclusions:

Most adults did not know the previous moderate-intensity PA recommendation, which indicates a need for effective communication strategies for the new 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Adults.

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Susan A. Carlson, Roxanna Guide, Thomas L. Schmid, Latetia V. Moore, Danielle T. Barradas and Janet E. Fulton

Background:

Street-scale urban design policies are recommended to increase physical activity in communities. Our purpose was to examine U.S. public support for local street-scale urban design features and policies.

Methods:

Analysis is based on a cross-sectional national sample of adults (n = 4682) participating in the 2006 HealthStyles mail survey.

Results:

About 57% of adults rated local street-scale urban design as highly important in determining the amount of physical activity they obtain. Adjusted odds of rating neighborhood features as having high importance were higher in people aged ≥65 years versus those <65 and minority racial/ethnic groups versus non-Hispanic whites. Two-thirds of adults were willing to take civic action to support local street-scale urban design policy. Adjusted odds of being willing to take any action versus none was higher in non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics versus non-Hispanic whites, was higher in those with household incomes ≥$60,000 versus ≤$15,000 per year, and increased as education and perceived importance of neighborhood features increased.

Conclusions:

There are high levels of public support for local street-scale urban design policies; however, demographic differences exist in the level of support. These differences are important considerations for policymakers and for those designing community programs targeting street-scale urban design features and policies.