Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author: Laurie M. Corna x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

John Cairney, Brent E. Faught, John Hay, Terrance J. Wade and Laurie M. Corna

Background:

Although physical activity (PA) has been demonstrated to reduce symptoms of depression and anxiety, research on the mental health benefits of PA in older adults is limited. Moreover, the psychosocial factors that might mediate or moderate the relationship between PA and depression in this population are largely unexplored.

Methods:

Using a sample of adults age 65 and older (N = 2736), we examined whether the major components of the stress process model (stress, social support, mastery, self-esteem) and physical health mediate or moderate the relationship between PA and depressive symptoms.

Results:

Physical health has the single largest effect, accounting for 45% of the effect of PA on depression. The stress process model, with physical health included, accounts for 70% of the relationship between PA and depression.

Conclusions:

Among older adults with above average levels of perceived mastery, greater physical activity is associated with higher levels of depression. Limitations and directions for further research are discussed.

Restricted access

John Cairney, John Hay, Brent E. Faught, Laurie M. Corna and Andreas D. Flouris

The purpose of this study is to test whether the activity-deficit experienced by children with probable Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) increases with age by comparing activity levels of children with movement difficulties to those of peers without movement difficulties. Using a sample of children ages 9 to 14 (N = 581), we examined whether age influences the relationship between DCD and participation in vigorous play activities and whether the impact of age in this relationship is the same for free play versus organized activities. Consistent with previous work (Bouffard et al. 1996), we found no evidence to support the hypothesis that children with DCD become more inactive compared to their peers as they age; however, we do discuss the limitations in our sample and how some differences in the level of organized and free play are evident among cohorts of different ages. Directions for future research in this area are also discussed. $$ 152 words