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Leah K. May and Matthew D. Curtner-Smith

Purpose: To determine the impact of two preservice teachers’ value orientations on their interpretation and delivery of the skill themes approach. Method: The short form of the value orientations inventory and five qualitative techniques were used to collect data. Participants’ value orientations inventory profiles were illustrated graphically. Interpretive data were analyzed using analytic induction and constant comparison. Findings: Results from the short form of the value orientations inventory indicated that Meagan prioritized social responsibility, learning process, and disciplinary mastery, while Jared favored social responsibility, self-actualization, and ecological integration. Qualitative data largely supported these value orientation profiles and indicated that the preservice teachers’ approaches to teaching skill themes differed and were influenced by their pedagogical beliefs. Moreover, qualitative data illustrated how Meagan’s and Jared’s value orientations and interpretations of the skill themes approach had changed and developed. Conclusions: These findings emphasize the importance of preservice teachers engaging in philosophical reflection on the connections between their beliefs and their interpretations of curriculum models.

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Leah K. May, Matthew D. Curtner-Smith, and Stefanie A. Wind

Purpose : To determine the influence of an elementary methods course and early field experience on eight preservice teachers’ (PTs’) value orientations. Method : The theoretical perspective employed was occupational socialization. Data were collected with the short form of the value orientation inventory and five qualitative techniques (formal and informal interviews, nonparticipant observation, critical incidents, and stimulated recall). The value orientation inventory profiles for the instructor and PTs were visually inspected for similarities and changes. Analytic induction and constant comparison were employed to analyze the qualitative data. Results : Value orientations of PTs with teaching and moderate coaching orientations were influenced by the methods course and early field experience, while those of PTs with strong coaching orientations were not. Factors leading to this evolution were the curriculum model employed, the instructor, and PTs’ increased confidence and knowledge of students. Summary and Conclusions : The study highlights the importance of faculty facilitating reflection on connections between instructional models and value orientations and how these relate to PTs’ beliefs.

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Matthew D. Curtner-Smith, Deborah. S. Baxter, and Leah K. May

In this article, the authors examine work conducted on 6 value orientations in physical education pioneered by Dr. Catherine D. Ennis and her colleagues. After providing an overview they focus on areas and methods of VOI research, specifically descriptions and comparisons (gender, teachers’ experience, school level, nationality, location, level of training, race, and physical activity background), the influence of value orientations on pedagogy (content and instructional models), and interventions (curricula and physical education teacher education). They conclude with suggestions for further research.