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Liane S. Lewis, James Hernon, Allan Clark and John M. Saxton

The present study investigated the convergent validity of an interview-administered IPAQ long version (IPAQ-L) in an older population by comparison with objective accelerometry movement data. Data from 52 participants (mean age 67.9 years, 62% male) were included in the analysis. Treadmill derived (TM-ACC: 1,952–5,724 cpm) and free-living physical activity (PA) derived (FL-ACC: 760–5,724 cpm) accelerometer cut-points were used as criterion. IPAQ-L measures (total PA, leisure-time, walking-time, sedentary time) were significantly correlated with accelerometry (P ≤ .05). Differences in sex were observed. Bland-Altman Limits of Agreement analysis showed that the IPAQ-L overestimated PA in relation to accelerometry. Our results show that an interview-administered IPAQ-L shows low to moderate convergent validity with objective PA measures in this population but there may be differences between males and females which should be further investigated.

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Liane S. Lewis, Barnabas Shaw, Srijit Banerjee, Pryscilla Dieguez, James Hernon, Nigel Belshaw and John M. Saxton

This nonblinded randomized controlled trial investigated the efficacy of a physical activity (PA) intervention underpinned by self-determination theory. Participants (N = 31, mean age 69 years [SD = 4.9]) diagnosed with bowel polyps were randomized to an active lifestyle program (ALP; n = 17) or standard care (n = 14). ALP received supervised exercise and counseling for 6 months. Both groups were followed up at 12 months. Outcomes were change in PA and behavioral regulation. Data were analyzed with intention to treat. At 6 months, differences were observed for behavioral regulation in favor of ALP (p < .05). PA differences were significant for leisure, walking, and vigorous in favor of ALP (p < .05). The self-determination theory can be an effective strategy for promoting PA behavior change in this population, but a larger trial is needed to further explore the utility of the self-determination theory in this context.