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Linda L. Bain

The researcher was a participant observer in a university class on fitness and weight control. Data collection procedures included questionnaires, observations, and interviews as well as access to physical performance information collected as part of the class. Results indicated that approximately half of the enrolled students were overweight, and that lean and heavy students had different expectations for the course. Four patterns of student participation emerged: serious runners, serious walkers, social interactors, and absentees. In general, the more successful students were lean and fit, while the class was not as effective in changing the exercise patterns of those who were less fit. The course seemed to be based on a technical-rational view which assumes that information will change behavior. In contrast, student reactions seemed to reflect a subjective-affective view that behavior is influenced by emotions and perceptions.

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Janice C. Wendt and Linda L. Bain

Physical educators’ perceptions of stressful teaching events do not change over a period of 1 to 5 years of teaching experience. Although there was a trend for priority and teaching function perceptions to be rated lower, no significant differences were found when using a MANOVA. Notification of unsatisfactory performance and being involuntarily transferred were rated the most stressful by both groups. Rated least stressful by both student and novice teachers was attendance at inservice meetings.

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Janice C. Wendt and Linda L. Bain

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Linda L. Bain and Ann E. Jewett

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Janice C. Wendt and Linda L. Bain

Concerns of preservice and inservice physical educators differ in the area of concerns for self and concerns for impact, which are lower in each instance when looked at in cross-sectional data. Longitudinal data only give evidence of lower self-concerns over time. Fuller’s prediction of higher concern for impact is not realized with this sample. It may be that Fuller’s scale is valuable only in predicting self-concerns.

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Janice C. Wendt, Linda L. Bain and Andrew S. Jackson