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Preparticipation Exam to Identify Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death

Julianna Shappy

Edited by Lindsey E. Eberman

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Athletic Pubalgia, Part 1: Anatomy and Diagnosis

Kelly E. Copperthite

Edited by Lindsey E. Eberman

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Athletic Pubalgia, Part 2: Case Reports

Kelly E. Copperthite

Edited by Lindsey E. Eberman

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Preparticipation Physical Exam to Identify At-Risk Athletes for Exertional Heat Illness

Lindsey E. Eberman and Michelle A. Cleary

Edited by Monique Mokha

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Closure Options for Skin Lacerations

Mike J. Ediger

Edited by Lindsey E. Eberman

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Defining Outcomes and Creating Assessment Tools for AT Education, Part 1

Leamor Kahanov and Lindsey E. Eberman

Edited by Malissa Martin

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Treatment of Fibromyalgia Syndrome With Low-Level Laser Therapy

Lindsey E. Eberman, Jesse Moore, and Timothy Demchak

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Physical Exertion Diminishes Static and Dynamic Balance in Firefighters

Kenneth E. Games, Zachary K. Winkelmann, and Lindsey E. Eberman

Half of all work-related injuries in the fire service are musculoskeletal-based due to slips, trips, and overexertion. This study evaluated the effects of physical exertion on balance in firefighters. Forty-one firefighters completed a physical exertion protocol with static and dynamic balance assessments while in personal protective equipment. Following the physical exertion protocol, we identified a significant decrease in anterior reach of the right limb, and significant increases in rectangular displacement area in both double- and single-legged stances. Balance is diminished in firefighters wearing personal protective equipment after engaging in a short bout of physical activity, suggesting a potential risk factor for lower extremity injury in the fire service.

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Fluid Delivery Method Influences Drinking Efficiency among Physically Active Children

Susan W. Yeargin, Sean M. Bowman, Lindsey E. Eberman, and Jeffrey E. Edwards

During physical activities, youth consume fluids from various delivery methods that may influence hydration behaviors. The purpose of this study was to determine the drinking efficiency of these different methods. Children’s fluid intake was more efficient when drinking from a cup compared with a bottle with no mouth contact and a water fountain, but not compared with a bottle with direct mouth contact. Drinking from the water fountain was the least effective compared with all other methods. Children drink more efficiently when using cups and water bottles with direct mouth contact as the delivery method compared with methods with no mouth contact.

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An Impacted Tibial Plateau Fracture in an Adolescent Diver: A Case Report

Jessica R. Edler, Kenneth E. Games, Lindsey E. Eberman, and Leamor Kahanov

The tibial plateau is a critical load-bearing surface in humans. Although tibial plateau fractures represent only 1% of all fractures, proper management by all members of the health care team, including athletic trainers, physicians, and physical therapists, is required for successful patient outcomes. A 14-year-old national-level competitive female diver injured her right knee during the precompetition warm-up period. Upon evaluation by an athletic trainer, the patient was referred for imaging and examination by a physician. She was seen by an orthopedic surgeon for consultation. The patient elected for a surgical repair of the tibial plateau fracture. Following surgery she underwent an 11-week comprehensive therapeutic exercise program with athletic trainers and physical therapists. The patient’s return-to-play progression included dry land activities, platform diving, 1-m springboard diving, and 3-m springboard diving. The patient has successfully returned to competitive diving. Proper identification of tibial fractures can be difficult considering their low occurrence in youth and their similar clinical presentation to more common youth injuries such as anterior cruciate ligament ruptures. Clinicians providing immediate on-site medical care should be thorough in their clinical exam including palpation and axial loading of the joint.