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  • Author: Luana Farias de Oliveira x
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Luana Farias de Oliveira, Bryan Saunders and Guilherme Giannini Artioli

Sodium bicarbonate (SB) is an ergogenic supplement shown to improve high-intensity exercise via increased blood bicarbonate buffering. Substantial amounts of the ingested bicarbonate are neutralized in the stomach. Bariatric surgery results in a small gastric pouch which dramatically reduces exposure time of any ingested food in the stomach. The aim of this study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of orally ingested SB in a postgastric bypass individual to determine the magnitude of changes in blood bicarbonate and associated side effects. We hypothesized that SB supplementation in a gastric bypass model would result in greater blood bicarbonate increases and fewer side effects than in healthy individuals due to minimal bicarbonate losses in the stomach. One postbariatric male ingested 0.3 g/kg·body mass of SB on three occasions (SB1, SB2, and SB3) and 0.3 g/kg·body mass of placebo on a further occasion. Blood bicarbonate was determined before and every 10 min following supplement ingestion for 3 hr and then every 20 min for a further 1 hr. Side effects were reported using an adapted questionnaire at identical time points. Maximal increases in blood bicarbonate with SB were +20.0, +15.2, and +12.6 mM, resulting in maximal bicarbonate concentrations of 42.8, 39.3, and 36.2 mM. Area under the curve was SB1: 8,328 mM/min; SB2: 7,747 mM/min; SB3: 7,627 mM/min, and 6,436 mM/min for placebo. Side effects with SB were scarce. Maximal bicarbonate increases were well above those shown previously, with minimal side effects, indicative of minimal neutralization of bicarbonate in the stomach. The large increases in circulating bicarbonate and minimal side effects experienced by our postgastric surgery bypass patient are indicative that minimizing neutralization of bicarbonate in the stomach, as would occur with enteric coated capsules, may optimize SB supplementation and thus warrants investigation.

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Vitor de Salles Painelli, Rafael Pires da Silva, Odilon Marques de Oliveira Junior, Luana Farias de Oliveira, Fabiana Braga Benatti, Tobias Rabelo, João Paulo Limongi França Guilherme, Antonio Herbert Lancha Junior and Guilherme Giannini Artioli

We investigated the effects of low- and high-dose calcium lactate supplementation on blood pH and bicarbonate (Study A) and on repeated high-intensity performance (Study B). In Study A, 10 young, physically active men (age: 24 ± 2.5 years; weight: 79.2 ± 9.45 kg; height: 1.79 ± 0.06 m) were assigned to acutely receive three different treatments, in a crossover fashion: high-dose calcium lactate (HD: 300 mg·kg−1 body mass), low-dose calcium lactate (LD: 150 mg·kg−1 body mass) and placebo (PL). During each visit, participants received one of these treatments and were assessed for blood pH and bicarbonate 0, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, and 240 min following ingestion. In Study B, 12 young male participants (age: 26 ± 4.5 years; weight: 82.0 ± 11.0 kg; height: 1.81 ± 0.07 m) received the same treatments of Study A. Ninety minutes after ingestion, participants underwent 3 bouts of the upper-body Wingate test and were assessed for blood pH and bicarbonate 0 and 90 min following ingestion and immediately after exercise. In Study A, both HD and LD promoted slight but significant increases in blood bicarbonate (31.47 ± 1.57 and 31.69 ± 1.04 mmol·L−1, respectively) and pH levels (7.36 ± 0.02 and 7.36 ± 0.01, respectively), with no effect of PL. In Study B, total work done, peak power, mean power output were not affected by treatments. In conclusion, low- and high-dose calcium lactate supplementation induced similar, yet very discrete, increases in blood pH and bicarbonate, which were not sufficiently large to improve repeated high-intensity performance.