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Agnès Bonnet, Lydia Fernandez, Annie Piolat and Jean-Louis Pedinielli

The notion of risk-taking implies a cognitive process that determines the level of risk involved in a particular activity or task. This risk appraisal process gives rise to emotional responses, including anxious arousal and changes in mood, which may play a significant role in risk-related decision making. This study examines how emotional responses to the perceived risk of a scuba-diving injury contribute to divers’ behavior, as well as the ways that risk taking or non-risk taking behavior, in turn, affects emotional states. The study sample consisted of 131 divers (risk takers and non-risk takers), who either had or had not been in a previous diving accident. Divers’ emotional states were assessed immediately prior to diving, as well as immediately following a dive. Results indicated presence of subjective emotional experiences that are specific to whether a risk has been perceived and whether a risk has been taken. Important differences in emotion regulation were also found between divers who typically take risks and those who do not.

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Noelia Galiano-Castillo, Manuel Arroyo-Morales, Angélica Ariza-Garcia, Carmen Sánchez-Salado, Carolina Fernández-Lao, Irene Cantarero-Villanueva and Lydia Martín-Martín

This study examined the relationship between the 6-min walk test (6MWT) and fitness, psychological and physiologic states, quality of life, cancer-related symptoms, and body composition of 87 women with breast cancer. The assessment included the 6MWT and evaluations of Cancer Quality of Life (EORTC C-30 and EORTC BR-23), cognitive performance (Trail Making Test), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, body composition, health-related fitness (abdominal test, multiple sit-to-stand test, trunk dynamometry), and pain (Brief Pain Inventory). We observed the following correlations: moderate between 6MWT and pain interference; modest for cognitive and social functioning and the multiple sit-to-stand test; fair for several items on the Cancer Quality of Life, for anxiety, lean body mass, trunk dynamometry and pain intensity; and weak for role functioning, loss of appetite, cognitive performance and depression. Thus, the 6MWT could be used as a measure of the major components of global health in women with breast cancer.