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  • Author: Marcos Daou x
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Marcos Daou, Taylor L. Buchanan, Kyle R. Lindsey, Keith R. Lohse and Matthew W. Miller

There is some evidence that people learn academic (declarative) information better when studying with the expectation of having to teach, but this has not been demonstrated for perceptual-motor skills, which also rely on declarative information but more heavily on procedural knowledge. To address this possibility, participants studied golf-putting instructions and practiced putting with the expectation of having to teach another participant how to putt or the expectation of being tested on their putting. One day later, learning was assessed by testing all participants on their golf putting. Results revealed that expecting to teach enhanced learning, even after controlling for the amount of studying and practicing. Therefore, we have presented the first findings that expecting to teach enhances motor learning. Taking these findings together with similar studies focusing on declarative information, we suggest that expecting to teach yields a general learning benefit to different types of skills.

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Kirk F. Grand, Marcos Daou, Keith R. Lohse and Matthew W. Miller

The present study investigated whether motivation and augmented feedback processing explain the effect of an incidental choice on motor learning, and examined whether motivation and feedback processing generally predict learning. Accordingly, participants were assigned to one of two groups, choice or yoked, then asked to practice a nondominant arm beanbag toss. The choice group was allowed to choose the color of the beanbag with which they made the toss, whereas the yoked group was not. Motor learning was determined by delayed-posttest accuracy and precision. Motivation and augmented feedback processing were indexed via the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory and electroencephalography, respectively. We predicted the choice group would exhibit greater motor learning, motivation, and augmented feedback processing, and that the latter two variables would predict learning. Results showed that an incidental choice failed to enhance motor learning, motivation, or augmented feedback processing. In addition, neither motivation nor augmented feedback processing predicted motor learning. However, motivation and augmented feedback processing were correlated, with both factors predicting changes in practice performance. Thus, results suggest the effect of incidental choices on motor learning may be tenuous, and indicate motivation and augmented feedback processing may be more closely linked to changes in practice performance than motor learning.

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Jence A. Rhoads, Marcos Daou, Keith R. Lohse and Matthew W. Miller

Expecting to teach and (actually) teaching has been shown to enhance learning academic information, possibly due to increased motivation and engagement. Recently, expecting to teach has been shown to augment motor learning. The present study investigated whether expecting to teach and teaching enhances motor learning, and whether motivation or engagement could explain this effect. Two groups studied/practiced golf putting with the expectation of teaching the skill via video demonstration at the end of practice, while the other two groups studied/practiced without this expectation. Following studying/practice, half of the participants who expected to teach performed a 2-min video demonstration of golf putting (Expect/Teach group). The other participants who expected to teach simply practiced for an additional 2-min (Expect/No Teach group). Similarly, half of the participants who did not expect to teach performed a 2-min video demonstration (No Expect/Teach group), while the other half engaged in additional practice (No Expect/No Teach group). Next, all participants self-reported their motivation and engagement. One day later participants were tested on their putting skills. Results did not reveal an effect of expecting to teach, teaching, or an interaction between these variables. However, exploratory analyses revealed motivation and engagement predicted motor learning, irrespective of group.